Saturday, September 12, 2009

Professional Expertise, Attitude, Initiative

Any time an O-6 attempts to communicate with a junior officer, there is well-known statistical evidence that documents the tendency of the JO to ignore the "older" generation. The perception is that there is no way that the analog old man can possibly understand the current plight of the digital, high-speed JO. I'm old enough to be your father, and I admit that my eight year old child can consistently kick my butt with a Nintendo, X-box or Wii. In relation to you, I am as old as dirt, but to keep it in perspective, after twenty-four years of dedicating my life to the Navy, the Navy has become as much of a family as my own bloodline, and I offer my "fatherly" advice to you with the same love and admiration that I would offer guidance to my own sons and daughters.

Captain Brian Hinckley in a brief excerpt from CDR Fred Kacher's (CO, USS STOCKDALE) new book, NEWLY COMMISSIONED NAVAL OFFICER'S GUIDE

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Not very good advice. A young officer wants to be treated like an adult, not your kid.

LT Aaron Smith said...

An adult doesn't hide behind an anonymous post. Grow a set and take responsibility for your words. My advice to you, son - or brother officer.

Anonymous said...

Nom de plumes and anonymity have served a long and recogized purpose in the exchange of ideas. It is the ideas put forth that are the issue to be debated, not the identity of the author.

Captain - Special Duty Cryptology said...

Agreed. I think that is why anonymous is an option here. And why the comments are not moderated.

Anonymous said...

Captain Lambert,

I have never seen a Junior Officer ignore an O-6, they instead treated him with respect or fear, and whichever the case was, the suggestion, advice, order or comment was acted on expeditiously and never ignored. Has the Navy changed that much?

Very Respectfully,
Navyman834

Captain - Special Duty Cryptology said...

Navymman834

Indeed the Navy has changed that much. It is not that uncommon for a Sailor (much less, a junior officer) to challenge the Captain - or an Admiral, for that matter.

Anonymous said...

Captain Lambert,

I am indeed sorry to hear that a Sailor can question his superior officers so easily and is allowed to get by with that. What ever happened to the good order and discipline that once was our standard in the Navy? NJP was a tool that was administered by the Commanding Officer and supported by all rated men/woman of that command. I felt it worked well in my time. All Sailors raised their right hand and swore to do amongst other things, obey the orders of officers appointed over them, which were in accordance with the Regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. What is so difficult about that? It appears to me that today’s Navy needs to do more than reset the Chiefs Mess if that is what is taking place.

Very Respectfully,
Navyman834

Mancub said...

All,

I think the point missed from those posting comments was the word "communicate". Orders aside, the ability for a senior to actually communicate with a junior is often difficult; there are cultural and language differences involved. I believe CAPT Hinkley is just pointing out one method that he used (with someone) to establish a common level of understanding in order to achieve a good dialogue. Being as the comment was an excerpt, I won't know for sure until I read the book. I will tell you that I have worked directly for the CAPT and it was a great experience both personally and professionally.