Sunday, March 26, 2017

The Marketplace of Ideas

In this rapidly globalizing 21st century, our nation and our military are out competing in a marketplace of ideas. We live in a 24/7 news cycle with near instant reporting and widespread dissemination of stories. It is a teeming, tumultuous, and exhausting marketplace. There has been a tremendous push for military professionals to understand, quantify, and assess our ability to compete in this arena. On all fronts, we must excel at strategic communication—the ability to get our message out to the right audience, at the right time, with the proper effect, and in all media.

Each of us has a clear obligation to contribute to this effort, to be a part of the conversation, to help our ideas compete. Our nation was founded on ideas that just could not be repressed—those of freedom and liberty. In 1776, we launched these ideas into a world ruled by a different system. Our ideas faced stiff competition, and throughout the years we have even suffered wars to defend them—wars like today’s struggle against extremists who use terrorism as a weapon, often to suppress freedom of expression. Our second President, John Adams, once wrote that the best way to defend our ideas was through using our minds: 
“Let us tenderly and kindly cherish, therefore, the means of knowledge. Let us dare to read, think, speak, and write.”

Admiral James Stavridis
USNI Proceedings

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

In case you forgot - Sailor

2-6 paragraph 11 Identifying Navy and Marine Corps Personnel . . . 
Capitalize the words "Sailor," "Marine" and “Service member” when referring to members of the U.S. Navy or U.S. Marine Corps. 

Secretary of the Navy, John Dalton in 1994 and reaffirmed in the March 2010 update.

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Practicing Reciprocity


Stephen Covey, author of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, uses the phrase “emotional bank account” to describe the principle of reciprocity in relationships. The emotional bank account describes the trust that accumulates in a relationship. Of course, you need to make deposits before you make withdrawals, so before you think about getting, take the first step to give.   Practice reciprocity to build trust between management, employees, and key stakeholders. To serve as a role model, be the first to engage in reciprocal behaviors. What can you give on your side of the exchange?

Mike Mears (2009-03-20). Leadership Elements,  Kindle Edition.

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Powerful thoughts


If you realized how powerful your thoughts are, you would never think a negative thought.

—Peace Pilgrim

Sunday, February 19, 2017

10000 hour rule - Malcolm Gladwell


Malcolm Gladwell's latest book OUTLIERS talks about what separates the stars from everyone else. It isn't raw talent. It is sheer persistence--those who practiced harder did better, and those who practiced insanely hard became wildly successful.  
Can the same be applied to Naval leadership?
        
Gladwell dubs this phenomenon the "10,000-hour rule." I think this can be applied equally to leadership. Becoming truly great at anything -- (leadership included) -- requires ten years of experience and 1,000 hours of practice per year. "Ten thousand hours is the magic number of greatness," he argues.

Becoming a leader requires "deliberate practice."

What are the elements of 'deliberate practice'? It's designed explicitly to improve performance -- the little adjustments that make a big difference. It's repetitive, which means that when it's time to perform for real, you don't feel the pressure. It's informed by continuous feedback; practicing leadership only works if you can see how you're improving.

Bits and pieces paraphrased (and others cut and pasted) from HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW.

Friday, January 27, 2017

Officer conduct


"Unless and until officers conduct themselves at all times as officers, it is useless to demand and hopeless to expect any improvement in the enlisted ranks.
Matters of correct attitude, personal conduct, and awareness of moral obligations do not lend themselves to control by a set of rules or to scientific analysis...Many methods of instruction and different approaches to teaching them will present themselves. Each naval officer must consider himself an instructor in these matters and the future tone of the naval service will depend on the sincerity which he brings to this task."
Admiral T. C. Kinkaid
United States Navy
1947

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Henry Miller on Writing


Writing, like life itself, is a voyage of discovery. The adventure is a metaphysical one: it is a way of approaching life indirectly, of acquiring a total rather than a partial view of the universe. The writer lives between the upper and lower worlds: he takes the path in order eventually to become the path himself.

Friday, January 6, 2017

2016 Multiplier of the Year


Please vote for Captain Sean Heritage as 2016 military multiplier of the year.  You can vote HERE.

The Five Disciplines of the Multiplier
1. The Talent Magnet: Attracts and deploys talent at its highest point of contribution.
2. The Liberator: Creates a climate of safety and ambition that both invites and demands people’s best thinking.
3. The Challenger: Define an opportunity that causes people to stretch.
4. The Debate Maker: Drives sound decisions through rigorous debate.
5. The Investor: Delivers extraordinary results again and again without direct management.




Monday, January 2, 2017

Not everyone can be a Sailor


A man or woman can be false, fleeting, a liar or a coward - in every way corrupt and still be an outstanding engineer, doctor, a great artist, cryptologist or a computer wizard.  But there's one thing they can't be and that is a Sailor or a Naval officer.