Friday, January 30, 2015

Letter Writing


His courtesy was somewhat extravagant. When he encountered anyone as punctilious as himself their correspondence ended only with death.

I would have answered your letter sooner, but you didn't send one.

Or don't you like to write letters? I do because it's such a swell way to keep from working and yet feel you've done something.
 ~Ernest Hemingway

Letters are among the most significant memorial a person can leave behind them.
~Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Thursday, January 29, 2015

MONTH LONG CELEBRATION OF FCC/C10F HERITAGE AND INNOVATIVE FUTURE

FROM DVIDS NEWS:


U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. TENTH Fleet


US Fleet Cyber Command celebrating 5 years of operationsPetty Officer 2nd Class David Finley
U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. 10th Fleet (FCC/C10F), which is headquartered in the Frank B. Rowlett Building located at Fort George G. Meade, Md., celebrates its fifth year of operations since being established on Jan. 29, 2010. Its vision: "Fleet Cyber Command’s vision is to conduct operations in and through cyberspace, the electromagnetic spectrum, and space to ensure Navy and Joint/Coalition freedom of action and decision superiority while denying the same to our adversaries. We will win in these domains through our collective commitment to excellence and by strengthening our alliances with entities across the U.S. government, Department of Defense, academia, industry, and our foreign partners."
FORT GEORGE G. MEADE, Md. - U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. 10th Fleet (FCC/C10F) is marking its fifth year of operations at Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, from Jan. 29 to Feb. 28, during a month long celebration of both its heritage and innovative future.

Since its establishment on Jan. 29, 2010, FCC/C10F has carried on the legacy of the former Naval Security Group and Navy Network Warfare Command in unifying warfighting capabilities — cryptologic/signals intelligence, information operations, electronic warfare, network operations and space capabilities — and converging them with the cyber domain.  

The commissioning of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and reestablishment of C10F on January 29, 2010 closely followed the Navy’s 2009 acknowledgement of information’s centrality to maritime warfighting, known as Information Dominance. Information Dominance is defined as the operational advantage gained from fully integrating the Navy’s information functions, capabilities, and resources to optimize decision making and maximize warfighting effects. The three pillars of Information Dominance are assured command and control (C2), battlespace awareness, and integrated fires. Fleet Cyber Command is a key warfighting element in delivering on missions across those three pillars. 

FCC/C10F was created in 2010 as part of the Chief of Naval Operations' vision to achieve the integration and innovation necessary for warfighting superiority across the full spectrum of military operations in the maritime, cyberspace, and information domains.

U.S. Fleet Cyber Command reports directly to the Chief of Naval Operations as an Echelon II command and is responsible for Navy Networks, Cryptology, Signals Intelligence, Information Operations, Electronic Warfare, Cyber, and Space. As such, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command serves as the Navy Component Command to U.S. Strategic Command and U.S. Cyber Command, and the Navy’s Service Cryptologic Component Commander under the National Security Agency/Central Security Service, exercising operational control of Fleet Cyber Command mission forces through TENTH Fleet (C10F). 

C10F is the operational arm of Fleet Cyber Command and executes its mission through a task force structure similar to other warfare commanders. In this role, C10F provides operational direction through its Maritime Operations Center located at Fort Meade, executing command and control over assigned forces in support of Navy or joint missions in cyber/networks, information operations, electronic warfare, cryptologic/signals intelligence and space.

Looking ahead, FCC/C10F’s vision is “…to conduct operations in and through cyberspace, the electromagnetic spectrum, and space to ensure Navy and Joint/Coalition freedom of action and decision superiority while denying the same to our adversaries. We will win in these domains through our collective commitment to excellence and by strengthening our alliances with entities across the US government, Department of Defense, academia, industry, and our foreign partners.”

The updated strategic plan to achieve this vision will be released at the end of February 2015.

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

LEADERSHIP


Sailors are growing fatigued.  You are going to have to show them what you are made of.  Show them some real leadership and make that tough decision.  They are waiting.

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Kirby’s Rules

From: 20 Questions With John Kirby

From The Pendulum: Doctrine Man HERE

Always be:
1. Good to your family 
Nobody succeeds at this business alone. We all need help. Take time to appreciate everything your family does to support you. They’ll never ask for your thanks, but they darn sure deserve it.
2. Skeptical 
Don’t be afraid to question policies or programs. You have to be the sanity check. If it doesn’t make sense to you, you are going to have a hard time communicating it. Worse, it may be a bad policy.
3. Courteous 
Treat everyone you encounter as if they were at your grandmother’s dinner table.
4. Professional 
Nothing about your job is personal, certainly not your relationships with media. You are always a spokesman … always. Be able to separate personal from professional issues.
5. Able to take two steps back 
It’s all about context. Find ways to put things into perspective. That’s what we do.
6. Right 
We can’t afford to pass bad information … ever.
7. Responsive 
Reply to emails promptly. Get the phone before it rings three times. Make sure people know how to get hold of you at all times. Don’t be afraid to give out your home number.
8. Engaged
 Let people see you; let them know you are informed and interested in what they are doing. Stay ahead of issues, get out in front. Think strategically.
9. Curious 
Ask lots of questions; be willing to learn no matter how long you have been at any command. Nobody cares how you did it before or how successful you once were. Listen.
10. Circumspect 
People have to know they can trust you with information, both at the command and in the media. Know when to speak up and when not to. Be trustworthy.
11. Yourself 
Don’t try to fit someone’s mold. Be true to who you are and let that reflect in your work. A phony PAO can be spotted — and distrusted — a mile away.
12. Able to laugh 
Sometimes your sense of humor will be all that gets you through. Take the work seriously, not yourself.
13. Physically Fit 
You represent the military. Look the part. Workout regularly. Wear your uniform smartly.

Monday, January 26, 2015

A Sure & Certain Way to KILL Innovation ??


Create an innovation task force.  You can read about the SECNAV's plan HERE. A task force is a certain way to kill innovation.  Is SECNAV unhappy with the progress of the CNO's Rapid Innovation Cell?  Will the two groups be related?  Work together?  Surely they are already competing for scarce resources.  Are they duplicating efforts?

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Saturday, January 24, 2015

The Long Gray (Navy/USAF/USMC/USCG) Online

"The compartmentalization of professional discussion is over. No longer will good ideas and fresh perspectives be restricted to a unit, post, or email chain. Today, chiefly due to the congruence of technology and the desire among a group of young field grades to have their voices heard, the institutional monologue has developed into a dialogue, with a variety of fresh, unique voices emerging above the fray. By consciously devoting themselves anew to the key tenets of reading, writing, and reflection, these officers and the Army (and I note, all the Services) are better for it."
You can read it all HERE.

Friday, January 23, 2015

Worth examining


"I am convinced that you and your organization, your unit, your group will never be EXTRAORDINARY in the long run without genuine concern for your people."

Leadership - What's Love Got To Do With It?
Colonel Art Athens
USMC - retired


Thursday, January 22, 2015

Someone had to be first

Excerpts from the Navy Times:

Commanding Officer, Naval Station Guantanamo Bay was unceremoniously removed from command for unspecified "misconduct" Wednesday amid a Naval Criminal Investigative Service Investigation.
Captain John Nettleton was fired by Rear Admiral Mary Jackson, head of Navy Region Southeast, "due to loss of confidence in Nettleton's ability to command," the region said in a press release.
Nettleton is a prior-enlisted Marine infantryman who was commissioned as a helicopter pilot in 1989. He has deployed aboard the carriers Theodore Roosevelt and Saratoga, and is a veteran of Operation Desert Storm. He took command of the controversial naval station in June 2012. Nettleton did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment Wednesday.
Nettleton is the first Navy commanding officer to be fired in 2015.

Just added this to my reading list


For more than two decades William S. Sims was at the forefront of naval affairs. From the revolution in naval gunnery to his development of torpedo boat and destroyer operations, he was a central figure in  preparing the U.S. Navy for World War I. During the war, he served as the senior naval commander in Europe and was instrumental in the establishment of the convoy system. Following the war his leadership as president of the Naval War College established the foundation of the creative and innovative Navy that developed the operating concepts for submarines and aircraft carriers leading up to World War II.
Despite his dramatic impact on the U.S. Navy, Sims’ books and articles are often overlooked. His lessons are especially important for a today’s military, facing budget cuts and missions in transition. This book is a collection of Admiral William Sims’ written work, and it investigates his relevance in addressing the questions facing today’s military personnel and policymakers.
LCDR Benjamin Armstrong, USN, is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and Norwich University and is a PhD candidate in War Studies with King’s College, London.  He has been awarded the Alfred Thayer Mahan Award for Literary Achievement and is the editor of 21st Century Mahan.

Wednesday, January 21, 2015

FCC/C10F STRATEGIC GOALS

While we wait for publication of Fleet Cyber Command/TENTH Fleet's new Strategic Plan, we can be certain that this will be included:

The value the U.S. Fleet Cyber Command team brings to Navy and Joint commanders moving forward will be measured based on our ability to:
  • Operate the Navy network as a warfighting platform;
  • Conduct tailored signals intelligence (SIGINT);
  • Deliver warfighting effects;
  • Create shared cyber situational awareness; and
  • Establish and mature Navy’s Cyber Mission Forces.
You can read the latest from VADM Jan E. Tighe HERE.

This from fellow blogger George Ambler


Busyness kills leadership as:
  • Busyness is fake work, it has the appearance of work, but doesn’t deliver results.
  • Busyness gets you doing unnecessary work. When unnecessary work is done time is wasted.
  • Busyness is seductive as it makes you feel important.
  • Busyness traps you into using your time and energy for doing good work rather than investing it in your great work.
  • Busyness robs you of the capacity needed to reflect and to think deeply about important issues and decisions of the day.
  • Busyness keeps you reacting rather than responding and initiating.
His excellent blog is HERE.

Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Mark your calendar for 4-5 March. Free to the military - if you are in the area, you should stop by

American Society of Naval Engineers

ASNE Day (will be held for 2 days), the annual meeting of the American Society of Naval Engineers (ASNE), and the Marine Machinery Association Spring Meeting will be held March 4-5, 2015, at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City in Arlington, VA. 

Right now, VADM Jan E. Tighe is a confirmed speaker on March 5, 2015 from 1330-1500. She'll be talking about Cyber Security.

Monday, January 19, 2015

Deadline fast approaching - CNO Rapid Innovation Cell - From NAVY NEWS


The CNO invites junior officers and enlisted Sailors to apply for the CNO's Rapid Innovation Cell for 2015. Applications are being accepted until Jan. 31. 

Successful applicants will develop innovative technology or processes as part of the CNO's Rapid Innovation Cell, or CRIC, established in 2012 to take advantage of opportunities outside the Navy mainstream, empowering innovators with flag leadership advocacy and financial resources to develop prototypes that can be rapidly transitioned to the fleet. 

Volunteers from a cross-section of Navy communities are sought to participate as a collateral duty without a geographic relocation or release from present duty assignment. This is an "additional duty" assignment. 

Successful applicants will join a group of successful current CRIC members. For more information, join the CRIC on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/navyCRIC, or via NMCI at https://www.nwdc.navy.mil/ncfi/CRIC/default.aspx. Application forms: https://www.nwdc.navy.mil/ncfi/cric/lists/application/newform.aspx . 

NWDC POCs are Lt. Jackie Kvinsland (jackie.kvinsland@navy.mil, 757-341-4687) and Cameron Cooper (cameron.cooper@navy.mil, 757-341-4731).

Sunday, January 18, 2015

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Some Saturday humor

"If you make people think they're thinking, they'll love you; but if you really make them think, they'll hate you."

Donald Robert Perry Marquis

Friday, January 16, 2015

Navy is beginning to get serious about strategy - we're going to "strengthen the connective tissue" between education and billet assignments

LOTS OF GOOD NEWS IN THIS !!


In order to enhance our Navy's ability to develop and implement strategy 
and policy while strengthening the connective tissue between our education 
programs and strategy billet assignments, the CNO has created a Strategic 
Enterprise that will:
--Ensure the focused development of Navy Strategy.
--Align Navy Strategic Documents.
--Establish informed linkages between strategy and our budget.
--Coordinate and synchronize strategic messaging and engagement.
--Create a culture of strategic thinking.
--Develop a cadre of Navy strategists.


You can read the entire NAVADMIN HERE.

And, you must read this USNI article by Commander Michael Junge in the February 2012 issue of PROCEEDINGS - So Much Strategy, So Little Strategic Direction.

Thursday, January 15, 2015

I don't know if CNP said this or the article writer just winged it

Navy Times staff photo by Mike Morones
"However, the Navy always sends officers to school in between shore and sea duty for a refresh."  I don't know about you, but I never went to school for a refresh - ever.

You can read the entire article HERE  Some of it makes sense.  I am always puzzled when we have someone in very senior positions articulate what Third Class Petty Officers and junior officers have been saying for years.

VADM Moran is talking about changing things up.  We know we need to change.  We are very resistant to change.  Will we change?  Probably not very much.

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

This, from CDR Salamander's blog about the V-22 replacing the C-2. It seems like the same sentiment can be applied to so many decisions.

"Ummmm ... yea. In the end, we'll wind up with XXXX and Sailors will do the best they can with what their Navy has given them.

We could have done better, but then again - those making the decisions are not the ones who will live or die by them."


Understanding what strategic decision making is all about could help. Many people think that strategy is about future decisions.  It's not.  It about the futurity of present decisions.  What decisions could have been made 15 years ago to prevent the Navy from making the difficult decision about C-2 replacement now? This isn't something that snuck up on us.

Tuesday, January 13, 2015

VADM J. E. Tighe to speak in London at the 2015 Cyber Defense and Network Security Conference

VADM Jan E. Tighe will speak for at the Cyber Defence and Network Security 2015 (CDANS) in London on 21 January.  The conference will provide attendees with high level strategic briefings from over 25 senior international military, government, critical national infrastructure and industry cyber experts. Offering unique accounts of national and corporate cyber defence strategies, including the most recent programmes and requirements, as well as insight into the latest technologies and innovations available from industry, CDANS 2015 is an invaluable opportunity to learn, network and engage in discussion on this crucial issue. 

As the cyber threat evolves and the incidence of attacks increases, maintaining preparedness and situational awareness is vitally important. Customised malware, DDoS attacks and the vulnerabilities of mobile and enterprise networks all present real challenges. However, the opportunity to come together and share ideas, solutions and initiatives and to facilitate deeper cooperation in cyber defence must be harnessed.
The complete list of international cyber expert speakers is HERE.  Cost of the conference is 700 pounds ($1000) for military and 2000 pounds ($3000)  for civilians. 

Speaker Information

Vice Admiral Jan Tighe
Vice Admiral Jan TigheCommander, US Fleet Cyber CommandUS Navy

Monday, January 12, 2015

What are you doing to get ready for the 80th Anniversary of the Naval Security Group ??

On 11 March 1935, "Communications Security Group", the predecessor organization to the Naval Security Group Command, was established. 11 March 2015 will be our 80th Anniversary!!

I bet that Rear Admiral Eugene St. Clair Ince, former Commander, Naval Security Group Command is ready for a party.


Sunday, January 11, 2015

FCC/C10F STRATEGIC PLAN NEARLY COMPLETE !!

A couple of NIOC COs and FCC/C10F staffers "in the know" report that VADM J.E. Tighe says that the FCC/C10F Strategic Plan is nearing completion (though a bit behind her desired release of 21 November 2014).  Expectations are that it will be released before the 5th Anniversary of the establishment of FCC/C10F on 29 January 2015.

Previous post about this is HERE with additional details.

Saturday, January 10, 2015

I am a year behind.


2014 DoN Ethics Training is behind the NMCI firewall and not available on the internet, according to the e-mail below that I received from AGC (Ethics).  The same may be true for 2015 DoN Ethics Training.

---------------------

Its been made available on an internal system.   

Joel A. Weger
Assistant General Counsel (Ethics) 
Department of the Navy


Honor.  Courage.  Commitment.

This email may contain material that is confidential, privileged and/or attorney work product for the sole use of the intended recipient. Any review, reliance or distribution by others or forwarding without express permission is strictly prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender and delete all copies.


Friday, January 9, 2015

USS HYMAN G. RICKOVER (SSN 795)


IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release No: NR-009-15
January 09, 2015

Navy Names New Virginia-Class Attack Submarine


Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced today that SSN 795, a Virginia-class attack submarine, will bear the name USS Hyman G. Rickover.
Mabus named the submarine to honor U.S. Navy Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, the man credited for developing USS Nautilus (SSN 571), the world's first operational nuclear-powered submarine.

Virginia-class submarines provide the Navy with the capabilities required to maintain the nation's undersea supremacy well into the 21st century. They have enhanced stealth, sophisticated surveillance capabilities, and special warfare enhancements that enable them to meet the Navy's multi-mission requirements.
Virginia-class submarines have the capability to attack targets ashore with highly accurate Tomahawk cruise missiles and conduct covert long-term surveillance of land areas, littoral waters or other sea-based forces. Other missions include anti-submarine and anti-ship warfare; mine delivery and minefield mapping. They are also designed for special-forces delivery and support.
Each Virginia-class submarine is 7,800 tons and 377 feet in length, has a beam of 34 feet, and can operate at more than 25 knots submerged. It is designed with a reactor plant that will not require refueling during the planned life of the ship, reducing lifecycle costs while increasing underway time.
Media may direct queries to the Navy Office of Information at 703-697-5342.
For more news from secretary of the Navy, visit www.navy.mil/local/secnav/
For more information about Virginia-class attack submarines, visit http://www.navy.mil/navydata/fact_display.asp?cid=4100&tid=100&ct=4

Vice Admiral Lando Zech - Officer, Gentleman, Shipmate - Gone but never forgotten

Lando W. Zech, Jr., VADM, USN, Ret., 87, who later served as Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission died on Sunday, January 9, 2011. Admiral Zech, a resident of Falls Church, VA was born in Astoria, Oregon and spent his youth in Seattle, Washington, where he attended Roosevelt and Lakeside high schools. He was appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1941. At Annapolis, he played varsity baseball and basketball. In his senior year, he captained the baseball team. 

Admiral Zech served 39 years in the Navy after his graduation from the Naval Academy in 1944 with the World War II Class of 1945. His first assignment was to the destroyer USS JOHN D. HENLEY (DD 553) in the western Pacific where he participated in the second battle for the Philippines, the Iwo Jima and Okinawa campaigns and on picket station duty off the coast of Japan during the last days of the war. After the war and a second destroyer tour on the USS HENRY W. TUCKER (DD 875), Admiral Zech volunteered for submarine duty and subsequently commanded four submarines, USS SEA ROBIN (SS 407), USS ALBACORE (AGSS 569), and after nuclear power training, USS NAUTILUS (SSN 571) and USS JOHN ADAMS (SSBN 620). He later commanded the guided missile cruiser USS SPRINGFIELD (CLG 7). 

Upon his selection to flag rank, he served as Commandant of the Thirteenth Naval District in Seattle, WA, the Chief of Naval Technical Training in Memphis, TN and as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Japan in Yokosuka. After his selection to Vice Admiral he served as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Manpower, Personnel and Training and Chief of Naval Personnel in Washington, D.C. He retired from the Navy in 1983. Admiral Zech graduated from the Armed Forces Staff College, the National War College and received a Masters Degree in International Affairs from George Washington University. In addition to campaign and foreign service medals he was awarded two Distinguished Service Medals, two Legions of Merit and the Navy Commendation Medal. 

On retiring from the Navy he was appointed a Commissioner and later Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by President Ronald Reagan. During this 5 year appointment he visited all 110 nuclear powered plants in the United States and many plants overseas including Chernobyl after the accident in the then Soviet Union. 

After retiring from the NRC, he served on the Board of Directors of the Commonwealth Edison Company (now Exelon) for another 5 years and later as a Nuclear Safety consultant. Admiral Zech had been a resident of Falls Church since 1983. He was a parishioner of the Cathedral of Saint Thomas More in Arlington, VA, a supporter of the U.S. Naval Academy, the Archdiocese for the Military Services, U.S.A., the National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton and a member of the Army Navy Country Club. 

He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Josephine K. Zech; five daughters: Janet Z. Cocke (James) of Richmond, VA, Joanne Z. Lyons (Coleman) of Atlanta, GA, Nancy Z. Cunnane (Robert) of Coto de Caza, CA, Carol M. Zech of Arlington, VA and Patricia Z. Nelson (Kirk) of Sammamish, WA.; his 12 grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Also surviving are his brothers, Dr. Robert J. Zech and Dr. Jerome M. Zech, both of Seattle. He was preceded in death by his brother John R. Zech. 

Memorial gifts may be made to the Archdiocese for the Military Services USA, 1025 Michigan Ave. N.E., P.O. Box 4469, Washington, DC 20017 or to the Naval Academy Foundation, 291 Wood Road, Beach Hall, Annapolis, MD 21402-5001 or to the Cathedral of Saint Thomas More, 3901 Cathedral Lane, Arlington, VA 22203. 

Thursday, January 8, 2015

REAR ADMIRAL GEORGE PATRICK MARCH AWARD WINNER AND SOME TRULY AWESOME CTIs

1978 (the glory days) photo of NSGA MISAWA High Frequency Voice Coordinator hard at work at DCTA01.
Our NSGD Barbers Point crew received the G.P. March Award three years in a row.
SUBJ/FY2014 LANGUAGE EXCELLENCE AWARD RECIPIENTS//
MSGID/GENADMIN/COMUSFLTCYBERCOM/-/DEC//
REF/A/GENADMIN/COMUSFLTCYBERCOM/232030OCT14//
AMPN/REF A IS SOLICITATION FOR FY2014 LANGUAGE EXCELLENCE AWARD NOMINATIONS//
GENTEXT/REMARKS/1. USFLTCYBERCOM held language excellence award selection boards with subject matter experts from NAVIDFOR and COMNAVPERSCOM IAW REF A. It is my pleasure to announce the recipients for the following awards:
A. Command Language Program of the Year/RADM G. P. March award winner is NIOC Maryland.
B. Language Professional of the Year is CTI1 Harrison J. Goforth, NIOC Maryland.
C. Senior Language Professional of the Year is CTICS Tristan E. Bell, NIOCBahrain.
2. FCC winners will be nominated to compete at the Department of the Navy level.
3. In addition to our winners, nominees below also contributed greatly to our Navy and National missions and deserve recognition:
CTIC Yves Michaud, NIOC Kaneohe Bay (formerly NSGD Barbers Point)
CTI1 Brian Mccombs, NIOC Hawaii
CTI1 Caleb Walser, NIOC Kaneohe Bay (formerly NSGD Barbers Point)
CTI2 Imane Miranda, NIOC Georgia
CTI2 Timothy Santens, NIOC Texas
4. This program recognizes the best language professionals in our domain and all command nominees should be rightfully proud of their accomplishments. I personally congratulate all candidates submitted for consideration.
VADM Tighe sends.//


Rear Admiral George Patrick March, Commander Naval Security Group Command

If you were at FCC/C10F btwn 9 August 2013 and 23 February 2014, you earned this !!


Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Navy Cyber Power 2020


While we wait for the 2015 update to the Fleet Cyber Command/TENTH Fleet Strategic Plan, you can take a look at the combined OPNAV N2/N6 and Fleet Cyber Command/TENTH Fleet plan for Navy Cyber Power 2020 HERE

There are three principal documents which will guide Navy Information Dominance and Cyber warriors into the future. They are: the Navy Strategy for Achieving Information Dominance 2013-2017, Navy Cyber Power 2020, and the Navy Information Dominance Corps Human Capital Strategy. 

OPNAV N2/N6 and Fleet Cyber Command/TENTH Fleet committed to issuing a supporting roadmap detailing lead and support organizations for each strategic initiative and the major actions necessary to accomplish them.  (NOTE: I have not been able to find that supporting roadmap.  If you can point us to where it's located, I think other readers would appreciate it.)  

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

TENTH Fleet's 5th Anniversary is fast approaching






29 January 2015 will mark the Fifth Anniversary of the re-establishment of the TENTH Fleet and the initial establishment of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command.

How far we've progressed in five short years !

BZ Shipmates.

Monday, January 5, 2015

Criticism


And, as Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld was fond of saying, 
"If you aren't being criticized, you may not be doing much."


More great art from Gaping Void is HERE.

Sunday, January 4, 2015

Etiquette - a reminder


  1. the forms, manners, and ceremonies established by convention as acceptable or required in social relations, in a profession, or in official life.
  2. the rules for such forms, manners, and ceremonies.
Some of you should brush up on your etiquette lessons; some could use a simple refresher; still others need to start from scratch.  And then, there are some senior officials who simply don't have a clue.  You know who you are.  It will come back to bite you in the end. (And, by in 'the end' I mean butt also!)

Saturday, January 3, 2015

Remembering my friend, mentor and lunch partner


http://www.robcannonphoto.com
Back in 1981, the Chief of Naval Personnel, Vice Admiral Lando W. Zech Jr. made a very wise detailing decision.  He sent CWO3 Wallace Louis Exum to teach celestial navigation at Officer Candidate School in Newport, Rhode Island.  I was one of hundreds of his students at OCS.  Both men influenced my Navy career greatly.  VADM Zech signed off on my first set of orders in June of 1982, sending me to Atsugi, Japan to fly with Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron ONE (VQ-1).  Thirty years later, both men were still in touch with me and we developed into great friends.

Sadly, Vice Admiral Zech passed away four years ago this month and is no longer with us, except in spirit.  The last time I saw him, he was in good spirits.  He was ill and weakened from his lengthy hospital stay - but his spirits were high. We talked a little bit about the USNA honoring him and a few of the other guys recently for being Captains of their varsity baseball teams over the years.  He was very proud of his years at the United States Naval Academy.
Besides being an athlete, he was very much an old school nuclear submariner and later a surface warfare officer. My goodness, how he loved the Navy and his family.  After his retirement from the Navy, he was Chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.  He leaves behind a wonderful widow - Jo, 5 beautiful daughters and many grand children.  And a very sad Shipmate who still grieves deeply and tries to keep his memory alive in all ways that he can.  Farewell Admiral Zech.  Those who knew you - loved and respected you greatly.  Those who didn't - missed out on a great experience.  I said my good-byes at Arlington National Cemetery but they were in no way - final good-byes.  You will remain fresh in my memory.

His obituary:

ZECH LANDO W. ZECH. JR Vice Admiral, U.S. Navy (Ret.) Former NRC Chairman Lando W. Zech, Jr., age 87, a retired Navy Vice Admiral who later served as Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission died on Sunday, January 9, 2011. Admiral Zech, a resident of Falls Church, VA was born in Astoria, Oregon and spent his youth in Seattle, Washington, where he attended Roosevelt and Lakeside high schools. He was appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis in 1941. At Annapolis, he played varsity baseball and basketball. In his senior year, he captained the baseball team. Admiral Zech served 39 years in the Navy after his graduation from the Naval Academy in 1944 with the World War II Class of 1945. His first assignment was to the destroyer USS JOHN D. HENLEY (DD 553) in the western Pacific where he participated in the second battle for the Philippines, the Iwo Jima and Okinawa campaigns and on picket station duty off the coast of Japan during the last days of the war. After the war and a second destroyer tour on the USS HENRY W. TUCKER (DD 875), Admiral Zech volunteered for submarine duty and subsequently commanded four submarines, USS SEA ROBIN (SS 407), USS ALBACORE (AGSS 569), and after nuclear power training, USS NAUTILUS (SSN 571) and USS JOHN ADAMS (SSBN 620). He later commanded the guided missile cruiser USS SPRINGFIELD (CLG 7). Upon his selection to flag rank, he served as Commandant of the Thirteenth Naval District in Seattle, WA, the Chief of Naval Technical Training in Memphis, TN and as Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Japan in Yokosuka. After his selection to Vice Admiral he served as Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Manpower, Personnel and Training and Chief of Naval Personnel in Washington, D.C. He retired from the Navy in 1983. Admiral Zech graduated from the Armed Forces Staff College, the National War College and received a Masters Degree in International Affairs from George Washington University. In addition to campaign and foreign service medals he was awarded two Distinguished Service Medals, two Legions of Merit and the Navy Commendation Medal. On retiring from the Navy he was appointed a Commissioner and later Chairman of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission by President Ronald Reagan. During this 5 year appointment he visited all 110 nuclear powered plants in the United States and many plants overseas including Chernobyl after the accident in the then Soviet Union. After retiring from the NRC, he served on the Board of Directors of the Commonwealth Edison Company (now Exelon) for another 5 years and later as a Nuclear Safety consultant. Admiral Zech had been a resident of Falls Church since 1983. He was a parishioner of the Cathedral of Saint Thomas More in Arlington, VA, a supporter of the U.S. Naval Academy, the Archdiocese for the Military Services, U.S.A., the National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton and a member of the Army Navy Country Club. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Josephine K. Zech; five daughters: Janet Z. Cocke (James) of Richmond, VA, Joanne Z. Lyons (Coleman) of Atlanta, GA, Nancy Z. Cunnane (Robert) of Coto de Caza, CA, Carol M. Zech of Arlington, VA and Patricia Z. Nelson (Kirk) of Sammamish, WA.; his 12 grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Also surviving are his brothers, Dr. Robert J. Zech and Dr. Jerome M. Zech, both of Seattle. He was preceded in death by his brother John R. Zech. 

Friday, January 2, 2015

Baggage - lots of it

Let me say that I am carrying a lot of Navy baggage. I remain connected to the Navy from my very first day at the MEPS in St Louis, Missouri. Carry that through bootcamp in San Diego, California and a succession of great assignments in the Navy (Monterey, CA; San Angelo, TX, Misawa, JA; Newport, RI, San Diego, CA; Atsugi, JA; Barbers Pt, HI; Monterey, CA; Washington DC; Yokosuka, JA; Corry Station, FL and Washington DC). I can't let any of it go. I carry memories, lessons learned and friendships from each command with me to this very day. I can honestly say that I have maintained contact with a Shipmate from each and every place I have been. You can't let that baggage go.

Thursday, January 1, 2015

No prohibitions on blogs

There is also no prohibition on blogs operated by individual members as private citizens. The Department of the Navy recognizes the value of this communication channel in posting current information and supporting the morale of personnel, their family and friends. As long as personnel adhere to specific restrictions on content, the Department of the Navy encourages the use of blogs and recognizes this free flow of information contributes to legitimate transparency of the Department of the Navy to the American public whom we serve.

From SECNAVINST 5720.47B