Tuesday, November 8, 2011

MULTIPLIERS - How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter

Some of our fellow naval officers drain all the intelligence and capability out of their teams. Because they need to be the smartest, most capable person in the room, these officers often shut down the smarts of other really smart Sailors, Chiefs, civilians and officers, ultimately stifling the flow of ideas. You know these officers, because you’ve worked for and with them. You may be working for one now.  If that's the case, sorry - it sucks to be you. On the other hand, if your boss is a 'multiplier', you are one very fortunate individual.

Consider the senior naval officer who, week after week, suggests new tasks and assignments for your team—never letting you complete any one task, forcing you to scurry to keep up with her thinking rather than think for yourself and contribute your own ideas. Or, the executive officer who, despite having more than 15 top-notch officers in the wardroom, admits that he listens to only a couple of people at weekly meetings, claiming “no one else really has anything much to offer.” These naval officers—we call them “diminishers”—underutilize people and leave creativity and talent on the table.

We can't afford to leave anything on the table.  Read Liz Wiseman's book and learn how to become a MULTIPLIER and not a DIMINISHER.   Drop me a note with your e-mail address and I'll send a few of you a complimentary autographed copy.

14 comments:

Anonymous said...

All B.S. That's a capital B and a capital S!

Anonymous said...

I guess we know what kind of leader Anonymous 253 is. :)

Anonymous said...

This is a great book and I find it extremely applicable at the command level.

Anonymous said...

Mike Lambert sent me this book and I really appreciate it. It is still not politically safe to be associated with him so I won't leave my name. I am a former NIOC CO.

LCDRLDO/6440 said...

Great book. Should be recommended reading for all pay grades. Might have helped a few of the 21 CO's that have been fired this year.

Sean Heritage said...

Hosted another IWO CO today and she saw my Multipliers book on display in my office. Served as a calling card for people who truly take leadership seriously. It's required reading in our wardroom and a PO3 gave me a book report on it last week. As for Anonymous 4:44, the fact that you choose to let politics get in the way of expressing gratitude for one of your mentors speaks to all that is wrong in our community. I hope you choose to get over that...I did long ago.

Anonymous said...

Captain Lambert,

There are so many ways to instill leadership values and principles in individuals, but unless you possessed some of those values before you came in the military I feel you would have a difficult time in gaining those values after you become an adult. If you were raised in dishonesty and lack of responsibility, or if your objective was to get ahead by cheating and using unethical or amoral practices and judgments, there is a good chance that you will continue to be that way the rest of your life. These words are not to indicate that one person is better than another, but the values they were raised with can certainly enable them to evolve into an effective, efficient and responsible leader.

Very Respectfully,
Navyman834

Anonymous said...

Commanding Officer, Shawn Heritage,

Having read much of your blog “Connecting The Dots” and taking note of your thoughtful posts on that blog and another blog “I lIKE THE CUT OF HIS JIB” I am a little disturbed by a few of the things that I have seen posted on leadership and the principles thereof. One of the things that initially bothered me was the fact that you never seemed to make a big deal out of your rank or position even though you did say you were Commanding Officer of a Command. Some of the things posted and accepted on your blog would seem to allow a person to think that anyone who was the most intelligent, or was a had all the answers type would assume leadership. That is wrong, Captain, you are always in charge of those of lesser rank.

Your personal page “About Me” only states that you are a Navy Officer, you seem to be hiding the fact that you are the Commanding Officer of the Naval installation where you are stationed. I was unable to discern your rank until tonight, why are you hiding the fact that you are a Full Commander, and Commanding Officer of a Naval facility? I was never more than a Master Chief Petty Officer and a Command Master Chief of a nuclear powered Submarine for a number of years. But that rating and position allowed me to have considerable prominence in many cases. My Commanding Officers and Executive Officers respected my position and accepted my advice because of that position, and the fact that I upheld the standards of that position, but I always let them know who was in charge militarily, even though they were happy that I had provided them with the answer to more than a few problems.

You must always know who is in charge in the military, even if you are able to make changes to the Command decisions through a junior’s proper influence.

Very Respectfully,
E. A. Hughes, FTCM(SS)
US Navy (Retired)
Navyman834

Sean Heritage said...

Navy Man - I am extremely proud to have earned the honor of serving as CO of NIOC Pensacola and those who know me can tell you that though I do not hide that, I refuse to let it define who I am. The fact is that I am a Spouse/Father/Son First and a Sailor second. I am an interested contributor of a team who proudly wears the command pin. I continue to lead that team, but I am in no way more important than anyone else on that team. I hold myself to a high standard, and I do the same for all with whom I serve. Our command triad, wardroom, CPOs, and FCPOs celebrate our cooperative leadership model and things are pretty darn good in our little command of 200+. No need to flaunt my good fortune across the internet.

Given the amount of respect and gratitude I have for the many CPOs who continue to mentor me, your comment about you "being never more than a Master Chief Petty Officer and a Command Master Chief of a nuclear powered Submarine" sells yourself short. Both are incredible honors...what more is there? In fact, my son is disappointed that I will never be a Master Chief, and, quite frankly, I am pretty sure I wouldn't have made the cut had I chosen the enlisted path. My hat is off to you.

Those who overly celebrate positional authority, those who get caught up in the perceived power that comes with command, and those who feel compelled to remind others that they are in charge are the ones who concern me (and likely comprise the 21 COs who failed us so far this year). I do appreciate your comment and the opportunity to clarify for you that we can and many do lead without a specific collar device and without a specific positional platform (I believe you fall into this category). I will continue to do just that long after I relinquish the authority that comes with my current position. That said, I will never handover the responsibility of leading (and following) those with whom I am so fortunate to share my life.

CDR Sean Heritage
Proud CO, NIOC Pensacola - Today
Passionate Leader - Always

Jim Murphy said...

More of our COs (and XOs, CMCs, DIVOs, LCPOs, etc) should incorporate some of Sean's philosophies into their own leadership. Sean is a successful and respected Naval officer because of many of the things he writes about here. And being the grumpy old retired SCPO I am, I don't say that about many officers (as Sean will attest).

Anonymous said...

Captain, Sean Heritage,

Thank you for expressing your feelings, position and attitude toward the profession where you have chosen to spend most of your working life. I have been retired from the Navy for more than 33 years, but in the Navy where I spent my working life things are evidently quite different than they are today. I had for my entire Navy career, and will always, as far as I can determine, had an attitude that was drilled into us Sailors that superior rank was the top honor and the most respected position of any Sailor. I still have that same opinion, be it right or wrong today. I wanted to hear you express your opinion on the subject and you did just that. Having no power to make things revert to where we were during my Navy career, I will no doubt have to change my attitude before I am able to accept the status quo of today’s Navy, and the procedure by which a command is controlled and nurtured today.

I want to thank you for your good words concerning a Master Chief, and your sons position on that as well, it makes me feel very good to understand that we were, and are still valued by others, even today. I was indeed proud to be a Master Chief, and was especially proud to have served as Chief of the Boat on a Submarine during the Cold War, I would also add that my Commanding Officer during that period of time never failed to inform me as an individual at the end of each deterrent patrol that he was pleased with my performance during that patrol and thanked me for making this another successful patrol. What an honor to receive such a complement from a Commanding Officer. I made 6 deterrent patrols with that same Commanding Officer. That was the most important job I ever had while in the Navy and I would have continued doing that job but the Navy said it time for me to go ashore.

Very Respectfully,
Navyman834

Curtis said...

I very nearly puked. Crap, make that I did puke.

Command is command. It's not leading a girl scout troop but what the hell, like the girl scouts you and your 'command' will never GO to war.

Anonymous said...

Curtis is evidently from a different planet than most of us. He is what we refer to as a troll who probably is not qualified to write a fitrep on a girl scout, let alone on a leader of men as he has claimed to do.

Navyman834

Anonymous said...

Liz Wiseman via Twitter
lizwiseman #Multipliers is at #15 in management books on amazon.com right now. Thank you to whoever is buying it!