Friday, October 1, 2010

Rear Admiral Jan E Tighe - officially a Navy Flag Officer

Jan E. Tighe, Deputy J3, Deputy Director of Operations, USCYBERCOM, gets her first star on 1 October 2010 at ceremony held in Ft Meade, Maryland. She is a 1984 graduate of the United States Naval Academy (USNA) and was selected for Flag by the FY11 Restricted Line Flag Officer Selection Board. 

She earned her PhD from the Naval Postgraduate School in 2001.  She is a qualified Naval Aviation Observer (NAO) in EP-3 reconnaissance aircraft as a communications intelligence (COMINT) evaluator (COMEVAL).  She was the Commander of NSA Hawaii and the Deputy Director of the Information Operations Directorate for Naval Security Group. 

Her official bio is available on the official Navy leadership biography site HERE.

Congratulations Jan, your Shipmates are proud of you!

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Shipmates? Shipmates? How can they be proud of her? Has she ever been to sea? WTH?

Former VQ-1 SEVAL/EWMC said...

In the IW community, assignment to reconnaissance units such as VQ-1/2 and VPU-1/2 are 'sea tour' equivalents.

MustangCryppie said...

Having done tours at sea and with VQ and VPU, there is no comparison between duty on a ship and with a recce squadron. None.

11 Steps to LCDR said...

Please tell me what great experience either of you obtained while at sea as either a divo or as doubtfully ever served as a CRC.

Flap your gums all you want, but I doubt either of you are served our community have as well as she is.

Post Command O5 said...

As a post command Arleigh Burke sailor, it disturbs me when the Navy selects someone for Flag when they haven't been to sea. This is the Navy, after all. I accept it, but it still bothers me. I guess it is normal for intel types. Just not enough at sea opportunities to go around.

Anonymous said...

The value of going to sea for an 1610/1810 is that is where you can experience the support provided by the community. I will tell you when I was stationed at a field site or flying in EP-3s I thought we were pretty darn good. But when I went to sea as a DivOff, CRC, and numbered fleet cryppie, I learned otherwise each time. Sea duty allows you to see through the self congratulatory hype and experience what is really going on.

DIRSUP LDO said...

The debate over sea time is a non-starter in this case. She was one of the first female COMEVALS and was already a senior LT at the time. Sea duty opportunities prior to and subsequent to that tour were hard to come by. While recognizing the value of sea time for anyone in the Navy, the real value to the IW officer is exposure to the fleet. Let's face it, surface IW, in its current and former iterations, is not where it's at. I did 22 years, including 13 in DIRSUP/PCS and can say without a doubt that from a professional satisfaction perspective, surface duty came in dead last on the list. Great exposure to the fleet but during OEF/OIF, where's the bang for the buck?

15 years at sea said...

Recalling his words about "we are command not staff", I think this is what Admiral Arleigh A. Burke would call a 'paper admiral'.

Shore Duty Sailor said...

I am not sure about the value of sea time for women - check out Captain Graf for example.

Anonymous said...

It was stated earlier that it's disturbing for the Navy to select someone for Flag when they haven't been to sea.

By that logic, Admirals such as Hasley, Nimitz, Zumwalt, Dewey, BURKE, etc should not have been leading Sailors as officers because none of them were prior enlisted.

Futhermore, only Air Force pilots and Infantry Soldiers/Marines should be made Generals.
My point is, there's more to the Navy than the sea. There are other domains where our security is threatened and the Navy works in all of them. It should not be a surprise or disturbing to anyone that Flag level leadership comes from these areas.