Friday, September 26, 2014

From NavyNews


FORT MEADE, Md. (September 26, 2014) Adm. Michelle Howard, vice chief of naval operations (VCNO), greets Vice. Adm. Jan E. Tighe, commander U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/ U.S. 10th Fleet (FCC/C10F), during a visit to FCC/C10F headquarters. VCNO received an update on FCC/C10F operations and plans, met with Sailors and civilian staff, and participated in a roundtable discussion with Tighe and her leadership team. The visit was also a remarkable moment for gender integration, with the two leaders having each made history in 2014. On July 1 of this year, Howard made U.S. Navy history as first female ever promoted to the rank of four-star admiral. Earlier, on April 2, Tighe became the first female commander of a numbered fleet in U.S. Navy history when she took the helm of FCC/C10F. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class David R. Finley Jr./Released) 140926-N-VE701-005

13 comments:

RAND said...

Recognize that individual and systemic behavior in newly inte- grated occupations will be influenced by the pioneer effect for an undefined amount of time and, thus, that assertions about the suc- cess of integration, the ability of female personnel to perform on a par with their male colleagues, or retention behavior may be pre- mature.

Anonymous said...

RAND: To which "newly integrated occupation" are you referring? Women have been serving and leading in the Navy for decades.

Anonymous said...

I suppose Admiral Howard and Vice Admiral Tighe could talk about their time at sea and achieving credibility in operational tours.... oh wait a second... that would be a short conversation.

Anonymous said...

While admittedly, ADM Howard might have more to say from her tour aboard Rushmore. FIBRON 7, and the Expeditionary Strike Group, VADM Tighe did fly operational missions as a Special Evaluator during the first gulf war. I notice you didn't leave your credentials. Both women were selected from their respective years groups and found to be the best qualified for promotion. These are some sharp women and capable naval officers.

Anonymous said...

Anon at 7:58 AM

Did you use FIBRON on purpose? It's really PHIBRON, right?

Anonymous said...

FIBRON, 10TH PHLEET, whatever it takes! :-)

Anonymous said...

I wonder if ADM Howard still concerns herself with the enlisted sailor and civilian seafarer killed on her watch as First LT onboard USS Flint in 1993, or the fact that the CO CDR Sharrett took a bullet for her at Admiral's Mast.

Anonymous said...

Some are familiar with reports on the death of a sailor aboard the USS Flint on October 7, 1993 in Oakland, California. The sailor was killed by riding in an elevator not meant for passengers.

To point to First LT Howard as the cause is fruitless. She may bear some responsibility and I am sure she holds some residual guilt over the death but the CO was ultimately responsible, as was the sailor.

You can't independently find her at fault. There was an appropriate JAGMAN inquiry and she was not found to be responsible. You can FOIA the report if you feel differently and read it for yourself.

Answers said...

According to Howard, sweeping changes in the Navy over the last 20 years have made it possible for her to overcome all obstacles in her quest to command. "There were definitely ... individuals who didn't want me in a particular position," she said in an interview with Ebony. "And the issue either revolved around my gender or my race." She persevered, however, and came to realize, after discussions with female friends in civilian life, that her opportunities for advancement and fair compensation were better in the Navy than they were on the outside.

Anonymous said...

I don't need to FOIA the report to "feel differently". I served on FLINT and the truth was well known onboard. She shared negligence with all in her chain of command. Together they violated Rule 1: don't hurt or kill anyone on your watch. Please forgive me if I don't properly bow at the alter of affirmative action and political correctness.

Epilogue: That sailor who was killed performing assigned maintenance without any assistance and supervision has a child that just celebrated another birthday (21st) without ever knowing him.

Unknown said...

I knew Steven he was a good man and is still missed. He should have been supervised and proper safety protocols in place

Unknown said...

I knew Steven he was a good man and is still missed. He should have been supervised and proper safety protocols in place

James Lawrence said...

My apologize his name was Thomas not Steven I lost two friends that year.