Friday, September 30, 2011

Captain Steven Ashworth retired today

Rear Admiral Michael S. Rogers commented that there are two things that needed to be said about the Captain:

  • that he was respected, and
  • that he made a difference.
Steve, we respect you and you certainly made a difference.


Also, welcome aboard to the new Commanding Officer, Navy Information Operations Command Maryland - Captain Tim White !!

Vice Admiral Rogers to assume command of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/TENTH Fleet

Michael S. Rogers assumes command of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/TENTH Fleet today at a ceremony at Ft McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland.  He relieves VADM Barry McCullough.

Thursday, September 29, 2011

True Gentleman

“The True Gentleman is the man whose conduct proceeds from good will and an acute sense of propriety and whose self-control is equal to all emergencies; 
  • who does not make the poor man conscious of his poverty, the obscure man of his obscurity, or any man of his inferiority or deformity; 
  • who is himself humbled if necessity compels him to humble another; who does not flatter wealth, cringe before power, or boast of his own possessions or achievements; 
  • who speaks with frankness but always with sincerity and sympathy; 
  • whose deed follows his word; who thinks of the rights and feelings of others rather than his own; and 
  • who appears well in any company; 
  • a man with whom honor is sacred and virtue safe.”

- John Walter Wayland 1899

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

In case you may have forgotten

 "If you are not criticized, you may not be doing much."
- Rumsfeld's Rules
 
Oddly enough, Secretary Rumsfeld never criticized me.  I wonder if there is a message in that for me?

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

From THE Coach

"If you cheat on the practice field, you'll cheat in the game. If you cheat in the game, you'll cheat the rest of your life."

Vince Lombardi

Monday, September 26, 2011

NIOC Maryland Commanding Officer's Farewell Letter to his command and their families

Captain Lambert,

I want to share with you an article from the ANCHORWATCH that was written by my current Skipper at NIOC MD, Captain Ashworth.  After 25 years of Navy, Captain Ashworth is scheduled to retire on September 30, 2011.  I am convinced that any attempt to describe his character will fall short of reality.  Therefore, I submit to you his outgoing message to the NIOC MD family, an authentic depiction of his extraordinary leadership, absolute selflessness, and above all, incredible ability to inspire those under his command.

Very respectfully,
LTJG McNamara

-------
From the Skipper

"As I sat in my office discussing with the Public Affairs Officer my farewell message to the command, I thought about the significant chapter in history this command has written through its many substantial accomplishments over the past two years. The 3,000 plus Sailors who have passed through the Command’s doors have enabled literally hundreds of operations around the world in support of USPACOM, USSTRATCOM, USCYBERCOM, USEUCOM, USAFRICOM, USNORTHCOM, USCENTCOM, USSOCOM and USSOUTHCOM, NAVAF, NAVEUR, COMTENTHFLT, COMFIFTHFLT, COMSEVENTHFLT, COMFOURTHFLT and COMSIXTHFLT. You have touched every corner of the earth and the command has averaged more than 140 Sailors deployed at any single moment in time to Iraq, Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa, above, below and on the seas. Your devotion to duty and commitment to operational excellence has kept the Nation and Navy safe.

After my arrival two years ago, I knew that if I provided the leadership, strategic vision and guiding principles, correction and guidance when needed, the command would respond and achieve greatness. I was honored to have had the opportunity to address the entirety of the Chief Petty Officers’ Mess shortly after I met with Command Master Chief Scott Drenning. We talked about leadership philosophies and that under my command the Chiefs would run the command. Chiefs are the foundation of the Navy and if they took care of the day-to-day issues, the Officers would be allowed to keep their heads up with their eyesfocused on thinking strategically with longer range vision and innovation. The junior Sailors in turn, could be led, mentored, developed and Sailorized by the Senior Enlisted leaders and allowed to thrive and achieve their greatest possible potential. Under this leadership of command by negation style, the Sailors soared to greatness with too many achievements to mention in this writing. However, a few significant achievements are worth mentioning:

• Advancements averaged over 54 percent, three times the Navy’s average.
• Retention soared with the command earning the Retention Excellence award the last two consecutive years.
• Our language program was selected as the DoD Language Program of the year.
• We won the Navy’s Crystal award for barrack’s excellence.
• Over 29 command and community activities have enabled Fort Meade and the surrounding community to thrive with support to Saturday Scholars and Sarah’s House touching the lives of hundreds and leaving a lasting positive legacy. This commitment to the Navy and community helped earn the 2010 Naval District Washington Large Shore Category Community Service Award.
• All of your accomplishments have been truly amazing!

Although the command earned its share of accolades, we experienced tragedy in the untimely deaths of Petty Officer 1st Class Ronny Vigilant, Petty Officer 2nd Class Bradley Sunkins Jr., Mr. Raymond Borredo and Christian Dencklau. These tragedies shook the command to its foundation but proved the command’s resolve and showed we could mourn together and heal together as a strengthened Navy family.

I am very proud of each of you for what you have done, from building out the foundation of United States Cyber Command and Commander TENTH Fleet to enabling the operations conducted in the Mediterranean and Middle East; you have made a lasting difference in how the nation conducts cyber operations. I know that you wear the cloth of the Nation each day and don’t think twice about the sacrifices you make but realize that today in America, less than one percent serve in the armed forces. That one percent protects the remaining 99 percent of the American population and protects our American way of life, which allows each individual to sleep soundly in their beds while you stand watches around the world.

On that note, I would like to leave you all with one final thought on a conversation that I had with an acquaintance on what today’s American Sailor was like when pushed into a fight and as to how so few could possibly protect so many. He had a turned up eyebrow on the one percent number, so I asked him if he had ever seen the movie “True Grit?” He replied “Yes.” So I said the American Sailor is like the scene in the movie where Rooster Cogburn takes the reins of his American quarterhorse in his teeth and with a lever action rifle in one hand and a six shooter in the other, he charges off across the field with guns blazing to take on the enemy, knowing full well that he is out-numbered and out-gunned. At the core of the American fighting spirit is a bare knuckled brawler who, like the Greek Spartans, will always come back from a fight with their shield and that is how so few protect so many! He smiled back, saying “Enough said, I will sleep well tonight.” 

When you are old and gray bouncing your grandchildren on your knee, know that you have been a vital participant in an important chapter in history that has changed the world, made it safer and will be a shining light of pride for an entire nation to guide by as we move out into the 21st century. God bless each of you, thank you for your service and selfless sacrifice and I wish you all of the greatest happiness and successes that life and liberty have to offer."


Steven Ashworth
CO, NIOC Maryland

Vice Admiral Michael S. Rogers to assume command of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/ TENTH Fleet on 30 September 2011


The following non-civilian Executive Nominations were confirmed by the Senate during the current congress. 
September 23, 2011
PN911         NAVY

The following named officer for appointment in the United States Navy to the grade indicated while assigned to a position of importance and responsibility under title 10, U.S.C., section 601:

Rear Adm. Michael S. Rogers, to be Vice Admiral

For those about to assume new positions of leadership

"You can't do new and exciting things with your organization ... with the same old assumptions about what it means to lead." 

Bill Taylor
FAST COMPANY

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Retired General Provides Free Leadership Lessons and Guidance

General Stan McChrystal has established McChrystal Group - Leadership Solutions For Complex Problems.  You can visit their website HERE.  And even better than that, you can subscribe to the McChrystal Channel on YouTube HERE.  Great leadership advice from a great leader.  The price?  Your time.  You won't find a better deal anywhere.  I guarantee it!

Saturday, September 24, 2011

Courage

“Those who lack the courage (to do the right thing) will always find a philosophy to justify it.”

Albert Camus

Friday, September 23, 2011

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Human Experience Shows

Human experience shows that people, not organizations or management systems, get things done. For this reason, subordinates must be given authority and responsibility early in their careers. In this way they develop quickly and can help the manager do his work. The manager, of course, remains ultimately responsible and must accept the blame if subordinates make mistakes.

As subordinates develop, work should be constantly added so that no one can finish his job. This serves as a prod and a challenge. It brings out their capabilities and frees the manager to assume added responsibilities. As members of the organization become capable of assuming new and more difficult duties, they develop pride in doing the job well. This attitude soon permeates the entire organization.

One must permit his people the freedom to seek added work and greater responsibility. In my organization, there are no formal job descriptions or organizational charts. Responsibilities are defined in a general way, so that people are not circumscribed. All are permitted to do as they think best and to go to anyone and anywhere for help. Each person then is limited only by his own ability.

Admiral Rickover

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Don't Hide Errors and Shortcomings

"The man who cannot endure to have his errors and shortcomings brought to the surface and made known, but tries to hide them, is unfit to walk the highway of truth."
and
 “All that a man achieves and all that he fails to achieve is the direct result of his own thoughts”
- James Allen

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Under Attack

"Our networks are under attack on a regular basis, and we want to hear about the capabilities industry is building to deter this threat," said Navy Capt. Don Harder, Information Assurance and Cyber Security Program Office deputy program manager.

According to Internet security firm McAfee in 2010, 20 million new malware, or malicious software, was found with a record growing number of 55,000 new malwares per day. The United States Cyber Command announced that Department of Defense networks are scanned and probed by cyber threat enthusiasts at least six million time per day.

"The next battle is in the information domain, and the first shots have already been fired,"  said Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Gary Roughead.

"Our vision for cyber security within the Department of Defense and the Navy is to conduct agile cyber operations to ensure mission success. Missions should be difficult to disrupt," said Joshua Caplan, SPAWAR System Center Pacific integrated cyber operations portfolio manager.

Monday, September 19, 2011

Do What You Say You Will Do (DWYSYWD) - Stolen from Steve Farber, Extreme Leader

Many believe that credibility is the foundation of leadership.  How does one establish credibility as a leader?  The first step is to behave in a credible way.  You absolutely must Do What You Say You Will Do (DWYSYWD).  There is just no way to get around that immutable statement.  You have to lead by example.  And if, you're going to follow Steve Farber's methods of Extreme Leadership, then you will have to lead by extreme example. As former Commander, Naval Security Group Command , RADM Winsor Whiton used to love to say - you have to have your skin in the game (pig versus chicken in the bacon and egg breakfast).  You're a powerful participant and not a 'contributor'.  You must be willing to put yourself and your reputation at risk. You have to prove yourself to your Sailors and crew through significant, observable, daily action. 

Do you tell your Sailors - 'People are our most important asset'?

Prove it and then, prove it again in every action that you take.

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Navy Challenges in the OSD/OJCS Capabilities Based Planning Process

Navy briefers described their organizations’ attempts to cover all the bases in Capabilities Based Planning meetings called by OSD and OJCS personnel, but indicated that their organizations had insufficient resources to participate fully and effectively. Some lack of coordination and of internal Navy scheduling control was also evident. 

This may be due in part to the lack of clarity in OPNAV lines of responsibility for CBP activities; that lack sometimes results in a duplication of effort. In addition, other information provided to the committee indicates that the Navy is not always well represented in the DOD joint CBP processes.

Several non-Navy briefers noted that Navy representatives on the various boards and committees are often unfamiliar with the issues, not empowered to speak on behalf of the Navy, or absent. Regardless of whether these difficulties result from insufficient staff resources or other problems, they preclude justice being done regarding naval issues in the larger DOD environment and undercut Navy interests in competition for both influence and funding.

The full report is available for download HERE.

Saturday, September 17, 2011

Thursday, September 15, 2011

Captain Gary Edwards - Made an Honorary Chief Petty Officer - Approved by MCPON Rick West

“A long, long time ago, when I was a young, inexperienced ensign, I reported to my first ship, the USS Saginaw (LST 1188),” Edwards said. “An old, mean, crusty Chief Petty officer took me under his wing. Now technically, I was his supervisor, but in reality, I was his student.”  “He taught me that a good leader leads by example, and takes care of his Sailors,” Edwards continued. “The naval officer I am today was due to his mentorship all those years ago. And each day I try to live up to his expectations of what it means to be a good leader.” 

Standing just over 5-feet tall, Thompson is dwarfed by Edwards, who stands 6 feet, 4 inches. The audience roared with laughter as a member of the CID Chiefs Mess brought “The Equalizer” – a custommade, engraved oak stool – to the stage for Thompson to stand on as he pinned a set of his own anchors on Edwards’ uniform. 

With the designation of honorary Chief Petty Officer, Edwards joins such notables as comedian, Bill Cosby; actor, Ernest Borgnin; Chief of Naval Operations, ADM Gary Roughead; Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, ADM Mike Mullen; Pearl Harbor survivor-turned motivational speaker, William Gentry; current Secretary of the Navy, Ray Mabus and former Secretary of the Navy, Donald C. Winter.

“This is a very special honor for a very special officer,” Thompson said.  “In my 30 years in the Navy, I’ve never seen it happen before, but CAPT Edwards really deserves this honor.”

I am told that the MCPON declined Captain Edwards' 
offer to make him an honorary Ensign.

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

Stolen from Extreme Leader - Steve Farber

"There are many naval officers out there who think they want to be Commanding Officers, only to find themselves in command of two to four hundred officers, Sailors and Chiefs who expect them to demonstrate some genuine leadership, and then discover that all they really wanted was to wear a command pin, scrambled eggs on their cover and have premium parking.”
If, however, you do make the choice to leap into the ring, it’s because of your love of the challenge, the adventure, and that love is what makes the fear of the “sport” worthwhile. Not only do you accept the fear as part of the experience, the fear — in large part — creates and defines the experience. Extreme would not be extreme without fear. And fear would not be worth it without the love of the game.

The same is true of Extreme Leadership: it is the dynamic interplay of fear and love-two of the most powerful forces in the human experience. And in my estimation, those who actively and intentionally use the experience of fear and love everyday in their attempts to change things for the better — in whatever arena — are Extreme Leaders.

Read more from Steve Farber HERE.

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Rear Admiral Willie Metts - Information Warfare Officer

Deputy Chief of Tailored Access Operations,
National Security Agency

Rear Admiral Willie Metts
Rear Adm. Metts is a native of Danville, Ga. He graduated from Savannah State University in 1985, receiving a Bachelor of Science degree in Electronics Engineering Technology and was commissioned via the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps. Following commissioning, he performed initial sea duty on USS Thomas C. Hart (FF 1092) and USS Thomas S. Gates (CG 51), completing three deployments to the Mediterranean and Red Seas with sustained combat operations during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm.

Following initial sea duty assignments, Metts transferred to the
Naval Postgraduate School
from 1991 to 1993 earning a Master of Science degree in Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C4I).

Selected as a naval cryptologist (now Information Warfare) in 1993, Metts transferred to Naval Security Group Command Detachment Potomac, in
Washington D.C., and served as program operations director. In 1997, he reported for duty as Naval Security Group department head at Naval Computer and Telecommunications Station, Guam and subsequently fleeted up to executive officer. In 1999, he was assigned to the staff of commander, Carrier Group 2 embarked in USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) in Norfolk, Va., as cryptologic resource coordinator. During this assignment, he completed the maiden deployment of Truman to the Mediterranean Sea and Arabian Gulf
.

In 2001, Metts transferred to the
Naval War College, earning a Master of Arts degree in National Security Studies and Strategic Planning. After graduation, he reported to the staff of commander, United States Pacific Command in Hawaii
, where he served as deputy director, Collections and Information Acquisitions Division and completed the Harvard University Senior Executive Fellows Program in November 2004.

In 2005, Metts was selected as special assistant to commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet and in July 2006, reported for duty as commanding officer, Navy Information Operations Command,
Hawaii
. Following command, he reported in August 2008 to Navy Personnel Command, as division director for Information Dominance Corps and Foreign Area Officer Assignments.

In August 2010, Metts reported to United State Cyber Command as director of Intelligence. Metts was promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral (lower half), July 1, 2011.  In August 2011, he reported to the National Security Agency as deputy chief of Tailored Access Operations.

His personal awards include the Legion of Merit (3 awards), Defense Meritorious Service Medal (2 awards), the Meritorious Service Medal, Navy and Marine Cops Commendation Medal and various service and joint expeditionary medals and ribbons.

Monday, September 12, 2011

Great Expectations

Rear Admiral Michael S. Rogers, the Navy's Cryptologist, is  certain to be confirmed for his third star and will most likely take his place as Commander, Fleet Cyber Command/TENTH Fleet at the end of September.  RADM Rogers said not to make too much of  this promotion.  Seriously though, this elevates the game, so to speak (we know it's not a game at all).  Many in the Navy don't understand the fuss we IWs are making about this.  Mike Rogers is coming back to the Navy from the Joint Community as the Joint Chiefs of Staff (J2) Director for Intelligence. For us, it's a big deal.

For the next several years he will be sitting at the table with the 3 and 4 stars of the military services.  He's been at that table before (and he's very comfortable there)  but he's not really had a speaking part.  Now, I would say that he not only has a seat at the table but he has a vote - and, as a community, we have not had that before.  Certainly, some of our Flags have earned the respect of the Navy's most senior leaders but we've never sat among them - with a true speaking part about broad Navy cryptologic capabilities and requirements.

RADM Mike Rogers is going to quickly become the personification of the cryptologic community. He's going to passionately and emotionally represent our capabilities and requirements to the Navy at large. Admiral Rogers brings just the right mix of charisma, enthusiasm, and authenticity to his new job in a natural way because he's carried them with him in all his previous jobs. This new opportunity for leadership is not his alone; it belongs to all of you in the IW community, the IDC and the Navy. Have the courage to share your ideas with him openly, frankly and often. He deserves that from all of us.

Information Operations PRIMER

This latest revision of the Information Operations Primer provides an overview of Department of Defense (DoD) Information Operations (IO) doctrine and organizations at the joint and individual service levels. It is primarily intended to serve students and staff of the US Army War College as a ready reference for IO information extracted and summarized from a variety of sources. Wherever possible, Internet web sites have been given to provide access to additional and more up-to-date information. The booklet is intentionally UNCLASSIFIED so that the material can be easily referenced during course work, while engaged in exercises, and later in subsequent assignments.

You can download the full IO Primer HERE.

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Ten Years


To paraphrase Sir Winston Churchill:
As we approach the 10th anniversary of 9/11, never have so many Americans owed so much to so few of their countrymen.  Joseph J. Collins

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Some Notable Readers of My Blog - Thanks for stopping by

Admiral Tim Keating, former Commander, Pacific Fleet.

Lieutenant Commander Bob Maguire, Limited Duty Officer, former Commanding Officer, U.S. Naval Security Group Bad Aibling, Germany

Seaman Jim Aronson, USS Ronald Reagan

Widow of a Wounded Marine

CPO Jonathan Routszong - one of my awesome Sailors from NSGA Yokosuka, Japan

Allison - Author of the USN Chic blog

Commander Launtz Rodgers - great Navy guy

Mark Thompson - Pulitzer prize winning author and Time Magazine columnist

Liz Wiseman - Wall Street Journal best selling author of MULTIPLIERS

OPNAV Action Officer

NNWC Staff Member

Admiral Gary Roughead - Chief of Naval Operations

Rear Admiral Ned Deets - Former Commander, Naval Network Warfare Command

MCPO Hughes - Author of "Once I Was A Navyman"

Commander Sean Heritage - Commanding Officer, Navy Information Operations Command Pensacola

My Kid's Mom in Sweden

Captain Tom Botulinski - retired Deputy Commander, Naval Security Group Command

Commander Tim May, former Commanding Officer, Navy Information Operations Command Menwith Hill, UK

Lieutenant General Mike Maples, former Director, Defense Intelligence Agency

You - the unnamed person reading now.  THANK YOU FOR STOPPING BY. 

And, more than 3,856 others - all named ANONYMOUS !

If you are erroneously listed as a reader and do not wish to be, send me a note.  
If you are a notable reader and are not listed, send me a note.

Friday, September 9, 2011

Brain-on-brain warfare; you need to read...think.write.

In the end, the quintessential skill of an officer is about bringing order out of chaos. To do that, you have to be calm, and smart, and willing to do the brain work. Because in the end, 21st Century security is about brain-on-brain warfare. We will succeed not because we have more resources, or because our values are the best, or because we have the best demographics or geographic advantages—all of those things matter, of course. But in today’s turbulent 21st Century, we’ll succeed and defeat our enemies by out-thinking them. To do that, and to be successful senior officers, you need to read … think … and write.

Admiral James R. Stavridis

Thursday, September 8, 2011

18th Navy Commanding Officer Fired

Commander Mark Olson, Commanding Officer of USS THE SULLIVANS becomes the Navy's 18th CO fired in 2011. The ship erroneously fired on a fishing vessel during a gunnery exercise.

Writing


"Writing provides the thinker with an opportunity to make visual contact with the contents of his mind."

John Merriman

Wednesday, September 7, 2011

One Thing Committed People Do Better Than Everyone Else


Commitment: Doing what you said you would do even when you don’t feel like doing it anymore.
If you don’t feel like going, but you committed to going…go.
If you don’t feel like trying, but you committed to trying…try.
If you don’t feel like caring, but you committed to caring…care.
If you don’t feel like writing, but you committed to writing…write.
If you don’t feel like sharing, but you committed to sharing…share.
If you don’t feel like creating, but you committed to creating…create.
If you don’t feel like finishing, but you committed to finishing…finish.

Why?

Because that is what committed people do.

From Edward Paz HERE.

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

True enough

All writers are vain, selfish, and lazy, and at the very bottom of their motives there lies a mystery.

George Orwell

Monday, September 5, 2011

Transients - Ineffective in complex jobs

Complex jobs cannot be accomplished effectively with transients. Therefore, a manager must make the work challenging and rewarding so that his people will remain with the organization for many years. This allows it to benefit fully from their knowledge, experience, and corporate memory.

The Defense Department does not recognize the need for continuity in important jobs. It rotates officer every few years both at headquarters and in the field. The same applies to their civilian superiors.

This system virtually ensures inexperience and non-accountability. By the time an officer has begun to learn a job, it is time for him to rotate. Under this system, incumbents can blame their problems on predecessors. They are assigned to another job before the results of their work become evident. Subordinates cannot be expected to remain committed to a job and perform effectively when they are continuously adapting to a new job or to a new boss.

Admiral Hyman Rickover

Sunday, September 4, 2011

Change of Command on the horizon


Captain Donald P. Darnell, Jr. will be relieved as Commanding Officer, Navy and Maine Corps Intelligence Training Center on September 30, 2011, by Captain William Kotheimer.

Saturday, September 3, 2011

Senate Confirmation Hearing for RADM Michael S. Rogers nomination for VADM and appointment as FCC/C10F

For those of you waiting for Rear Admiral Rogers' promotion to Vice Admiral and appointment as  you'll have to wait until Congress returns after Labor Day.  Commander, Fleet Cyber Command/TENTH Fleet will have a Change of Command on 30 September 2011.  Look for RADM Rogers' confirmation hearing to be held after 6 September 2011 and hopefully before 30 September.  His prepared statement will be available HERE once the hearing is scheduled officially.

Friday, September 2, 2011

2011 VICE ADMIRAL JAMES BOND STOCKDALE LEADERSHIP AWARD WINNERS

CDR Chadwick
CDR Miranda
THE CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS IS PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE CDR GERALD N. MIRANDA, JR., FROM THE PACIFIC FLEET, AND CDR ROBERT B. CHADWICK, II, FROM FLEET FORCES COMMAND, ARE THE 2011 RECIPIENTS OF THE VADM JAMES BOND STOCKDALE AWARD FOR INSPIRATIONAL LEADERSHIP. CDR MIRANDA WAS SELECTED FOR HIS PERFORMANCE AS COMMANDING OFFICER, USS ASHEVILLE (SSN 758) AND CDR CHADWICK FOR HIS PERFORMANCE AS FORMER COMMANDING OFFICER, USS ROOSEVELT (DDG 80).
THIS FLEET AWARD WAS ESTABLISHED IN HONOR OF VADM JAMES BOND STOCKDALE WHOSE DISTINGUISHED NAVAL CAREER SYMBOLIZED THE HIGHEST STANDARDS OF EXCELLENCE IN BOTH PERSONAL EXAMPLE AND LEADERSHIP. THE AWARD IS PRESENTED ANNUALLY TO TWO COMMISSIONED OFFICERS ON ACTIVE DUTY BELOW THE GRADE OF CAPTAIN WHO ARE IN COMMAND OF A SINGLE SHIP, SUBMARINE, AVIATION SQUADRON, SEAL TEAM, NAVAL SPECIAL WARFARE SQUADRON, SEAL DELIVERY VEHICLE TEAM, SPECIAL BOAT TEAM, EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL MOBILE UNIT, MOBILE DIVING AND SALVAGE UNIT, OR NAVY SPECIAL CLEARANCE TEAM DURING THE NOMINATION CYCLE. CANDIDATES ARE NOMINATED BY PEERS WHO THEMSELVES MUST BE ELIGIBLE FOR THE AWARD.

THE 2011 WINNERS WERE CHOSEN FROM AMONG EIGHT OUTSTANDING FINALISTS IN A REVIEW PROCESS THAT INCLUDED SCREENING AT THE FLEET COMMANDER LEVEL AND FINAL SELECTION BY A BOARD OF SENIOR OFFICERS.

THE FOLLOWING FINALISTS DESERVE WELL-EARNED CONGRATULATIONS:
 
PACIFIC FLEET FINALISTS:
- CDR JAMES P. LOWELL, FORMER COMMANDING OFFICER, USS TORTUGA (LSD 46)
- CDR DAVID M. ROWLAND, COMMANDING OFFICER, USS CURTS (FFG 38)
- CDR WARREN E. SISSON, FORMER COMMANDING OFFICER, VFA-115
 
FLEET FORCES COMMAND FINALISTS:
- CDR THOMAS R. "TR" BUCHANAN, COMMANDING OFFICER, USS ALBANY (SSN 753)
- CDR MARK S. LEAVITT, FORMER COMMANDING OFFICER, HS-5
- CDR CHRISTOPHER A. MERWIN, FORMER COMMANDING OFFICER, EODMU 12

Practices of Successful Commands


See the note below from Admiral John Harvey, Commander Fleet Forces Command.  He continues a superb Navy program initiated back in the early 1980s - Command Excellence.  My Executive Officer and I updated these materials in the 1990s and provided them to the Command Leadership Course (CLC).  The  CLC still uses them today in their Prospective Commanding Officer/Executive Officer (PCO/PXO) courses.  You can find updated versions of Command Excellence materials HERE, HERE and HERE.

From: ADM J.C. Harvey, Jr USN

Team,

Over the past two years, I’ve released a series of “Practices of Successful Commands” messages to emphasize the importance of properly executing those programs that have the greatest influence on our Sailors, their families, and thus our Navy.

I released Part One to get the word out about what I observed some of our commands were doing that enabled them to stand out so positively above the rest. In Part Two I highlighted and asked that you give a good “spin” to a few of the programs that I felt needed some extra attention to keep them on track. And Part Three was targeted at what I believe to be the foundation of mission success – Trust.

In keeping with this effort, I recently released a “Practices of Successful Commands – Part Four” to call attention to several foundational programs that I believe, due to their significant impact on the readiness and professionalism of our Sailors, should be a priority for every command.

Although implementation of these programs starts at the top (with me and my direct reports), I’m posting this message here because meeting our objectives requires a steadfast commitment by all hands. That is why I need all of you to make sure you complete the mandatory training and apply what you learn on and off the job. My guidance to you is particularly applicable for the Substance Abuse Prevention, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response, and Suicide Prevention programs. It defeats the purpose of the training if you are attending simply to get a “check in the box.” The training for these three programs not only reinforces the “do’s and don’ts,” but also serves as a reminder of the warning signs exhibited by those (friends, family, shipmates) at risk.

I encourage you to read the message, think about it, and most importantly, do your part by completing the training and bringing that training to life in your command. Never forget – we’re all in this together.
All the best, JCHjr

Thursday, September 1, 2011

Full-Fledged Navy Information Warfare Captains and Commanders

C O N G R A T U L A T I O N S   to these Information Warfare Cryptologic Officer community Captains who were promoted today.

Chris Chrislip
Tom Ertel
Tony Hansen
Bryan Lopez
Ken Moreno
Doug Powers
Joe Pugh

And these new Commanders

Jamie Achee
Chris Bowen
Dan Brookes
Colin Chinn
Charles Clifford
Harold Cole
Barry James
Jeffrey Scott Moore
Owen Schoolsky
Joe Sears
Victor Spears
Robert Suh
Doug Wheaton
William Wood
Holly Yudisky