Saturday, October 4, 2014

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Remarkable. You just described the admiralty in America. I think all of us know that they have zero integrity.

Anonymous said...

Anon @ 0233. You presume that attaining Flag rank is equivalent to 'success'. Take a step back & think big picture. Collar device alone is not necessarily indicative of success.

Anonymous said...

Take 2 steps back and see who leads the navy and then tell me that collar device doesn't matter. You cannot lead this organization sans collar device. It is a great pity that almost all those with the stars on their collars lost their integrity.

If you doubt me, simply contrast any of them with VADM Stockdale.

Anonymous said...

Anon at 11:53 AM

The only people who think collar devices don't matter at the people who have eagles and stars on their collars. If they took them off, 95% would find that they aren't respected nearly as much as they believe themselves to be.

Anonymous said...

OK...What I meant by big picture... The 06 who completes a 'successful' command tour after 25+ years and retires without his wife and children at his side because he scuttled his family along the way is decidedly NOT successful.

James L. Hammersla said...

Saying that "that almost all those with the stars on their collars lost their integrity." is extreme hyperbole.

Yes, I have worked with some who I would say that statement is appropriate, but the vast, VAST majority I have worked with are very conscious of their ethics and integrity.

@Anon 6:33 -- well said. I had a wise SgtMaj once tell me that if I stuck around long enough to retire that most likely all I could count on would be a ceremony, a plaque and a blue ID card. If I had been foolish enough to ignore my family for the sake of my career that the day after that ceremony would be an incredibly sad day.

HMS Defiant said...

@6:33
Consider this: A leader who did in fact abandon his wife and children to lead men in battle in Afghanistan or Iraq on 9 deployments in 12 years. She hates him for being gone but I think his men appreciate him for being there with them.

In your terms, it a a no win situation. He had to go. It was his job. She hated his job and she divorced him.

How was that his fault?

James L. Hammersla said...

Our own personal measures of success change. At one time, me being a Marine was the most important thing to me and took precedence over personal relationships and even for a time my family back home.

After I got married, my priorities changed and what I considered my own measure of personal success changed with it. I made that commitment and if I really have to choose between the two, my family will win. This is a personal decision, and it is one we have to account for ourselves … if I choose my family over work, I may never get promoted again … I am okay with that and should never blame the system for my decision. The two ‘lives’ can exist in parity … we just have to make our own risk assessments, make a decision and be honest with ourselves about the outcomes.

At this point, I will work hard and give everything I can for the mission. I hope to move onto positions of increased responsibility and have an edifying personal life too. The Navy can put a new collar device on me or medal on my uniform etc. and I will be grateful but it is secondary to my wife and my kid.

Anonymous said...

James,

I will be happy to call you neighbor. You are blazingly, my kind of guy.

I thought the post described a warrior who 'abandoned' home You and me did something like that, my peers deployed 9 or more times. I was a 30 year guy, my dad was a 30 year guy, all of my friends from childhood were 30 year guys.

They joined the Army, i did not. At no time did any of us get an offer to decline a deployment. 9 or 10 deployments was the 'average' for my friends. It has been a very long war.

Anonymous said...

HMS - In your example he chose poorly and is responsible.

Either by choosing a profession where he was not in control of his destiny (He couldn't walk away when his family needed him.) or by choosing a spouse who wasn't able to deal with the profession.

Is he a success?