Sunday, July 12, 2009

Command Excellence - The Wardroom 1997-2000


U.S. Naval Security Group Yokosuka, Japan wardroom
at June 2000 Change of Command

Jay Ingersoll, John Breedlove, Keith Pabst, Andy Reeves, Paul Lashmet, Mark Meade, Mike Elliot, Lou Collazo, Tom Minton, Robert Hatmaker and Mike Lambert
Awards: Meritorious Unit Commendation 1997-2000, Gold Anchor for Retention 2000, Silver Anchor for Retention 1999, CNSG Maintenance Award 1997 - 1998, CINCPAFLT Best EW Unit, Captain's Cup Men's and Women's and so many more

OUTSTANDING WARDROOMS ARE COHESIVE
In superior commands the people in the wardroom work together. Competition to be the best individually is always there, but people in the top wardrooms also make sure they help each other out. Top department heads work out a give-and-take with each other, and work to help their division officers succeed in their jobs. Everyone in the top wardroom keeps the command's mission in mind. That mission takes precedence over individual glory.

OUTSTANDING WARDROOMS MATCH CO-XO RELATIONSHIP
In top wardrooms, COs and XOs get respect. Junior officers model themselves after their superiors. Junior officers know that the command tone is set by the senior officers and they follow the tone set by their superiors. If the senior officers are formal, the wardroom respects that formality. If the senior officers prefer a more jovial atmosphere, junior officers go along. Junior officers in top commands recognize that it is the CO's ship and do what they can to represent the CO's interests as completely as possible both inside and outside the command.

OUTSTANDING WARDROOMS RAISE CONCERNS WITH THE CO AND XO
Top wardrooms recognize their responsibility to the CO and XO for keeping the command informed on issues. They are not afraid of raising concerns with the senior officers. Junior officers know they must keep the senior officers aware of issues that may affect the command. This does not mean that the JOs do not try to solve problems on their own. Rather, they recognize that it is the captain's command, and that he needs to be aware of potential
problems.

OUTSTANDING WARDROOMS TAKE INITIATIVE
Junior officers in superior commands take the lead in solving problems in the command or in finding ways to improve the effectiveness of their department and the command. They do not feel that they should wait for someone else to do what is necessary. They are ready to make things happen themselves. They anticipate problems and try to prevent them before they occur.

OUTSTANDING WARDROOMS TAKE RESPONSIBILITY FOR WORK GROUP PERFORMANCE
Members of superior wardrooms take responsibility for the results of their departments and divisions. They delegate to their people in order to make things happen. This sense of responsibility gets transmitted down the chain of command, so everyone feels the importance of meeting deadlines and getting the work done well. Junior officers monitor their subordinates' performance and hold their subordinates accountable. They acknowledge the contribution of those in their departments and divisions. But the junior officers will take the heat if things do not work out.


Charting a New Course to Command Excellence - The Wardroom

3 comments:

Jim Seekings said...

I was there. Your command sucked.

Nuke said...

I agree.

Anonymous said...

Same here.