Thursday, October 24, 2013

For you know who, you know where


The true character of a Naval officer cannot be hidden from his peers, subordinates or family.  He can fool his seniors in the chain of command only as long as they wish to be fooled.  As the saying goes - "Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me."  There's enough shame to go around now.  Time for action.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

Well said, Mike - Well said. I am comfortable saying, and firmly believe your preposition as fact and the following as self evident; Navy is experiencing a crisis in leadership, mostly at the senior levels of the officer corps and specific senior enlisted ranks (Force and MCPON). What makes this situation worse, in the face of incontrovertible evidence, there's a strong vane of denial coupled with more of the same approach and nonsensical, self defeating band-aids. History will yield these years as a new low and deep, deep rot. On the upside, it's going to be a long slog through the dessert. Yes we in the middle ranks see this lack of charater clearly. We can be assured it will get worse - and then get better.

Anonymous said...

Your arrogance never fails to astound us.

A Sailor said...

It is fair to say that we have lost confidence. All that is left is for his senior in the Navy chain of command to lose confidence and the situation will be settled.

Anonymous said...

Is this about Kershaw again?

Anonymous said...

I think this is someone else.

Anonymous said...

"deep deep rot" is accurate. survival is moot.

Seth Lawrence said...

This is a great book with a great message. Don't think the post has anything to do with any one leader, but rather a generalization about leadership. I thoroughly enjoy reading Mike's blog and at times either chuckle at the comments or shake my head. Rather than fling anonymous comments about a though provoking post, take the time to introspect and provide critical comments so we can all benefit from your thoughts. Note, didn't say positive, but rather, critical. Keep the leadership content coming Mike, there is an appetite for it and eventually even the most obtuse of readers will absorb some of it.

Mike Lambert said...

Thanks Seth. This post isn't about any one leader in particular.

Anonymous said...

a long slog through the dessert.

Sounds delicious!

Anonymous said...

Annonymous
October 24, 2013 at 11:31 AM

From your writing, one would think you knew what you were talking about, but then when you say such things as senior enlisted ranks (Force and MCPON) you are incorrect these Sailors as mighty as they are, and maybe as messed up as they are have no rank, they do have rate instead. Please go back to basic Navy training, maybe this is part of the long slog through the dessert.

Navyman834

Anonymous said...

Navyman834:

Please note that Merriam-Webster includes a definition of rank as an aggregate of individuals classed together — usually used in plural.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ranks

I understand your point about rate and rating. In this instance, however, Anon @ 11:30 is not incorrect.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous,
October 28, 2013 at 12:40 PM

And you are correct in what Merriam-Webster has to say about ranks, but as far as I can discern this blog’s stated purpose it to address Sailors and inform Sailors and it should therefore be understood that the language used should apply to Naval Personnel. The manuals we use in the Navy give us the proper terminology and definitions that we should use. The SORM, the WORM, Navy Regulations, Uniform Regulations and for Navy Recruits, The Bluejackets Manual. If you will take the time to investigate these sources I think you will find the true meaning of ranks as far as the Navy is concerned. Using the proper nomenclature might even help us to overcome having to make that long slog through the desert.

Navyman834

James Hammersla said...

Good advicethat is applicable to a Naval Officer, Chief, White Hat, other services or just people in general. I am lucky enough to have never worked for a truly ‘toxic’ leader. I have worked with / around a small number of people who had been promoted beyond their ability.

Luckily what was really important was that I worked in organizations where performance & character counts.

Anonymous said...

Thank you, Navyman834, for advising me to take the time to investigate the sources you identified. However, I'm well-informed of their contents and, as I wrote initially, I understand rate and rating.

I also understand and appreciate the general context of enlisted ranks. I also believe I understand the intended message, so I don't allow myself to get wrapped up in the minor details.

I'm done on this particular topic because I follow the guidance about wrestling with a pig. If you don't know the quote, you should take the time to investigate it.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous,
October 30, 2013 at 10:39 AM

I see where you are coming from, but you must think of the young Sailors who do not possess your wisdom and can get confused by sudden changes in what they have been taught (we in the Navy are not a part of the unions where they refer to rank and file in respect to their members). I am aware that you know the difference between rate and rank, in this Navy and you should attempt to teach the junior Sailors to use the proper terminology rather than confusion amongst the troops.

I am aware of getting dirty and have been aware of that for more than 60 years, you hide behind anonymous to keep from getting dirty and having anyone find out about those things that you really think you understand. You dismiss me with a wave of your hand as if you were someone imperial but yet you exist as anonymous. I am unimpressed.

Navyman834
E. A. Hughes, FTCM(SS)
US Navy (Retired)