Saturday, April 30, 2011

Information Operations - redefined, clarified, codified

"The integrated employment, during military operations, of information-related capabilities in concert with other lines of operation to influence, disrupt, corrupt, or usurp the decision-making of adversaries and potential adversaries while protecting our own."
SECDEF Memo 25 January 2011 available HERE.

Friday, April 29, 2011

Classic Line


"...when you can't go where you want to, when you want to, you haven't got command of the sea." 
 ADM Forrest P. Sherman

Stolen from Sailor Bob HERE.

Thursday, April 28, 2011

Skipper number TEN gets fired

The Commanding Officer of USS MOMSEN, Commander Jay Wylie, was fired by Rear Admiral Mark Guadagnini, commander of the USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN Carrier Strike Group, “due to a loss of confidence in his ability to command stemming from allegations of misconduct.”  Commander Wylie is the 10th commanding officer fired in 2011.

Commander Wylie was commissioned in May 1992 after graduating from the University of Southern California (USC). Over his 19-year career, he served tours aboard USS PORT ROYAL and USS CARNEY and USS BENFOLD.  He served as executive officer of USS KIDD.

Commander Wylie had been in command of USS MOMSEN for 10 short months.

In a speech at USS MOMSEN change of command ceremony on July 8, 2010, Admiral Buzby said, “Becoming a commanding officer is the most sacred trust that can be bestowed upon an officer.  Only a select few are chosen.”   

Even fewer are successful at it.

Fundamental Purpose

The fundamental purpose of military power is to deter or wage war in support of national policy. In these capacities, military power is a coercive instrument, designed to achieve by force or the threat of force what other means cannot.  While it may be employed in more benign ways for a variety of important purposes across a wide range of situations, these other uses (i.e., GLOBAL FORCE FOR GOOD) should not be allowed to imperil its ultimate ability to wage war.

The full text is HERE.

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Trust and Personal Relationships: From the Flag Officer CAPSTONE COURSE

Trust and Personal Relationships:

Building trust with subordinates and partners may be the most important action that a commander will perform. Building this trust is a conscious act; it’s not something that just happens. You’ve got to plan for it, actively build it through your words and actions, and continue reinforcing it throughout the time in command.

There’s a great deal of literature on building trust. Stephen Covey in The Speed of Trust talks to trust as the "hidden variable" in the formula for organizational success. He brings out how trust always affects two outcomes: speed and cost. When trust goes down, speed goes down and cost goes up. Covey notes 13 behaviors that establish trust (talk straight, demonstrate respect, create transparency, right wrongs, show loyalty, get better, confront reality, clarify expectations, practice accountability, listen first, keep commitments, and extend trust). These principles have direct applicability in military command.

Trust and confidence is an essential prerequisite to achieving synergy and harmony, both within the force, and also with our interagency and multinational partners. We suggest you take time to think through how you gain and maintain trust and confidence with your higher commanders, your subordinates, and your partners.

The full package is HERE.

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

9th Senior Navy Officer Fired - Commodore DESRON ONE

Captain Donald Hornbeck, commodore of San Diego-based Destroyer Squadron 1, was fired by Rear Admiral Sam Perez, USS CARL VINSON Carrier Strike Group commander.  He served in command for five months.  Captain Hornbeck was fired on Saturday while USS CARL VINSON is operating in the Arabian Sea. He is under investigation for having an "inappropriate relationship."

His biography is below:

Captain Don Hornbeck was born in Indianapolis, Indiana and graduated from Ball State University with a Bachelor of Science Degree (Physics) in 1982. Following graduation, he worked in the private sector as a geophysicist from 1982-1984. He entered Officer Candidate School at Newport, Rhode Island through the Engineering Duty Option Program and was commissioned an Ensign in 1984. Following his initial sea tour, he elected to remain an Unrestricted Line Officer.

Captain Hornbeck has served at sea aboard ten ships, including: USS GATO (SSN 615) as Sonar Officer, Torpedo/Fire Control Officer, and as First Lieutenant; USS SPRUANCE (DD 963) as Strike Warfare Officer and Operations Officer; USS FORRESTAL (CV 59) as Propulsion Maintenance Officer and Propulsion Group Officer with the Aircraft Carrier Readiness Improvement Program (CV-RIP); USS CURTIS WILBUR (DDG 54) as Commissioning Weapons Control Officer, Combat Systems Officer, and Senior Watch Officer; MINE COUNTERMEASURES SQUADRON TWO, embarked aboard USS INCHON (MCS 12) as Humanitarian Assistance Coordinator during Albanian refugee assistance operations from April to June 1999; USS SENTRY (MCM 3) as Commanding Officer from August 1999 to March 2001; and USS BENFOLD (DDG 65) as Commanding Officer from August 2003 to June 2005. During his tour, BENFOLD deployed to South America in support of the escort of USS RONALD REAGAN (CVN 76) to San Diego, deployed to the Western Pacific, where they supported Operation UNIFIED ASSISTANCE tsunami relief efforts with the ABRAHAM LINCOLN Carrier Strike Group, received the USS ARIZONA Memorial Trophy Award for 2003-2004, the Battle Efficiency Awards for 2003, 2004, and 2005, and won the 2005 Pacific Fleet ASW Bloodhound Award. He was assigned as the Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff for Operations at CTF 70, embarked aboard USS KITTY HAWK (CV 63) from August 2005 to January 2007. From February 2007 to January 2009, Captain Hornbeck served as Deputy Chief of Staff / Fleet Operations Officer at U.S. SEVENTH Fleet, embarked aboard USS BLUE RIDGE (LCC 19). He reported as Deputy Commodore for Destroyer Squadron ONE, embarked aboard USS CARL VINSON (CVN 70), in January 2010.

Ashore, Captain Hornbeck served as a Theater Ballistic Missile Defense (TBMD) Program Integrator at the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO). In addition to his duties at BMDO, he attended Georgetown University, graduating with a Master of Arts Degree (National Security Studies). He then attended USMC Command and Staff College and was awarded his second Master’s Degree (Military Science). Following USMC Command and Staff College, he graduated from the Armed Forces Staff College and was subsequently designated a Joint Specialty Officer (JSO). From 2001 to 2003, Captain Hornbeck served as a Policy Planner on the Joint Staff (J5). While assigned to the Joint Staff, he was the lead Action Officer for what the Secretary of Defense called “the most significant changes to the Unified Command Plan since its inception in 1946.” Captain Hornbeck completed the National Security Management Program at the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University in 2007. He served at OPNAV N52 as Branch Head for Global Engagement Planning from January to October 2009 before Major Command.

Captain Hornbeck’s personal awards include the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit (three awards), Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (two awards), Joint Service Commendation Medal, Navy Commendation Medal (two awards), Joint Service Achievement Medal, and the Navy Achievement Medal (two awards). He assumed Command of DESRON ONE on 23 November 2010.  He was fired five months later on 23 April 2011.

Monday, April 25, 2011

Lead Story From CHINFO - Columbia University recognizes NROTC on campus

Columbia has reached an agreement with the U.S. Navy to officially recognize a Naval ROTC program on campus, University President Lee Bollinger said in a statement. The Reserve Officers' Training Corps has not been recognized by Columbia since 1969, when protests over the Vietnam War led to the elimination of Columbia's longstanding NROTC program. Bollinger told Spectator that the agreement is a “historic turning point” for the University.

Now that Columbia has decided that Naval ROTC is good enough for the campus - I really wonder if the Columbia campus is good enough for the U.S. Navy.  I don't think so.

Sunday, April 24, 2011

Eighth CO Fired - USS PONCE CO and XO relieved

CDR Etta Jones
Vice Admiral Harry Harris, Commander, U.S. SIXTH Fleet relieved the commanding officer (CO) and executive officer (XO) of the Norfolk-based, Austin-class amphibious transport dock USS PONCE (LPD 15) on Saturday, April 23.

Commander Etta "CJ" Jones, USS PONCE's CO was fired for "demonstrated poor leadership, and failure to appropriately investigate, report, and hold accountable Sailors found involved in hazing incidents. Additionally, she failed to properly handle a loaded weapon during a security alert which endangered some of her crew."

USS PONCE XO, LCDR Kurt Boenisch, was fired for "his failure to provide support to the command and commanding officer."

VADM Harris said, "When leadership fails in setting a proper example or upholding proper standards on his or her ship, they fail to serve our Sailors, our Navy and, ultimately, our nation."

Heads up, we know you're talking about us

More of Jeff Bacon HERE.

Saturday, April 23, 2011

FLTCM(AW/NAC) Mike Stevens, USN, Fleet Master Chief U.S. Fleet Forces Command

Fleet Master Chief Mike Stevens has a blog HERE.  Many great leadership tips and plenty of good information for Sailors on his BLOG.  

He's implemented a great new initiative to provide a one day JUMPSTART for your Chief Petty Officer Mess.  He brings staff over from the CMC/COB course and gives your group the kind of "pick me up" we all need.

Take some time to check him out.  It's worth the time.

Friday, April 22, 2011

FY12 Captains Selection List is in the SECDEF's Office

According to the NPC tracker HERE, the Selection List for FY12 Captain is in the SECDEF's office and release is imminent.  The list has been at OSD since 14 April.  These folks listed below and a few others (above zone) are waiting with bated breath for the official results of the selection board.  Soon everyone will be rushing to congratulate the selectees.  Take a moment of your time to consider those who are not selected and all their hard work which got them to this point.  With a compressed zone and selection opportunity reduced, this is a particularly tough year to make Captain.  We have 8-11 Captains retiring this year.  We'll need those newly selected Captains to hit the ground running.  The officers below are the Commanders who were in the primary zone for consideration.
  • SCHEIDT, JEFFREY S. - in command now
  • BEAN, CLIFFORD W. III 
  • CARNEY, CAMERON PHILLIP 
  • RANDOLPH, MARK D.
  • BATES, RUTH ANNE 
  • STEWART, ANDREW DONALD 
  • SCHUMANN, MICHAEL A.
  • BERG, HEIDI KRISTEN - previous CO Bahrain
  • DIEHL, WILLIAM J.
  • MATEO, NIELS F. - in command now
  • HINTON, KEVIN SCOTT
A reader has expressed confusion about this post.  THIS IS NOT THE SELECTION LIST (as all the officers listed above clearly understand).  The promotion zone for FY12 IWOs was compressed to those listed above in the primary zone.  Selection opportunity is estimated to be 60% or less.  Other modifications to the original post have been made in red.

Rear Admiral Andy Singer

RADM. Andy Singer speaks with student Lt. Beth Jasper
One aspect of the IDC, intelligence, has long been understood to be a critical area of opportunity over adversaries. NPS’ Intelligence Chair and Director of the Information Dominance Center of Excellence, retired Rear Admiral Andy Singer, noted that Information Dominance comes down to gathering information and using that information in a way that gives us an advantage over our adversaries. In that role, the Intel community is critical to maintaining dominance in the information realm.

“All the communities in the IDC are hunters and deliverers of Intelligence,” explained Singer. “While Naval intelligence focuses on delivering knowledge of the enemy, it takes the communities collective work to make that knowledge as complete as possible and from it find the opportunities to anticipate, know, predict and change the adversary’s desired effects. NPS is giving Navy Intelligence professionals the technical and regional expertise needed to master information advantages for our nation. In today's Navy, Intelligence is the key to knowing first and therefore acting first and best.”


The full article is HERE.

Thursday, April 21, 2011

The Lead Dog - an old dog's view

As the lead dog, you must work the hardest. The house dogs think that the lead position is the easiest—that the traces in the rear must be the tautest while the lead dog needs only to “guide” the team, his harness loose and comfortable. This might work on a clear day over an easy trail, but not when the job is tough. Recall your days in the back, when every ounce of strength from the whole team was needed. A slacker is a liability; a leader who is a slacker could be a calamity.

As the lead dog, you must be the disciplinarian, even sometimes during the run—but the best time is later, away from the team. Remember that your goal is to improve behavior; a chastened dog will pull hard to regain his spot on the team, but a humiliated dog is ruined forever. Before you growl at the errant one, look first to yourself. Did you train the offender properly? Did you provide the right equipment? Almost all of us will pull ’til our hearts burst; if one does not, then it is more often the fault of training or equipment rather than attitude. But discipline when you must; no one else will do it because it is your job.

The character you build as a follower is the one that comes through as a leader when the trail is icy, the wind is brutal, and the sled is top-heavy. It is no time to be a loner, or sloppy, or shortsighted. Take heart from my experience: a leader can build character in the team. He or she need only show its members the benefits of hard work, courage, selflessness, devotion, and excellence, and to these things they will respond with their whole hearts.

Leadership: An Old Dog's View
C. R. Anderegg (Colonel, USAF - retired)
Good stuff.  You can read it all HERE.

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Admiral Harvey - making sure his message on authority, responsibility and accountability is getting out

P 121300Z APR 11 ZYB PSN 617083K25
FM COMUSFLTFORCOM NORFOLK VA//N00//
TO COMSECONDFLT//00//
COMSUBLANT NORFOLK VA//00//
COMNAVCYBERFOR VIRGINIA BEACH VA//00//
COMNECC LITTLE CREEK VA//00//
COMNAVSURFLANT NORFOLK VA//00//
COMNAVAIRLANT NORFOLK VA//00//
INFO CNO WASHINGTON DC//N00/N09//
COMUSFLTFORCOM NORFOLK VA//00/01/N1//
BT
UNCLAS
SECINFO/U/-//
MSGID/GENADMIN,USMTF,2008/COMUSFLTFORCOM NORFOLK VA//
SUBJ/REQUIRED READING FOR USFF UPCOMING TOWN HALL
/FORUMS IN FLEET CONCENTRATION AREAS//
REF/A/MSGID:MEMO/COMUSFLTFORCOM/YMD:20110321//
NARR/REF A FORWARDED USFF MEMORANDUM ON AUTHORITY, RESPONSIBILITY, AND ACCOUNTABILITY.//
GENTEXT/REMARKS/1. CONTINUING THE TOWN HALL SESSIONS FLEET MASTER CHIEF STEVENS AND I KICKED OFF LAST WEEK IN JACKSONVILLE/MAYPORT, WE WILL TRAVEL TO THE OTHER USFF FLEET CONCENTRATION AREAS IN THE COMING WEEKS TO CONTINUE OUR FACE-TO-FACE DIALOGUE WITH COMMAND LEADERSHIP TEAMS. COMMANDING OFFICERS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, OFFICERS-IN-CHARGE, ASSISTANT OFFICERS-IN-CHARGE, COMMAND MASTER CHIEFS, AND COMMAND SENIOR ENLISTED ADVISORS FROM ALL UNITS NOT DEPLOYED OR UNDERWAY SHALL ATTEND ONE OF THESE SESSIONS.
2. THE DISCUSSIONS WILL FOCUS ON STANDARDS, ACCOUNTABILITY, RESPONSIBILITY, AND PROACTIVE LEADERSHIP. I EXPECT EVERY CO, XO, OIC, AOIC, AND CMC UNDER YOUR COMMAND TO READ, UNDERSTAND, AND BE PREPARED TO DISCUSS MATERIAL CONTAINED IN REF A, WHICH IS POSTED TO
HTTP://WWW.PUBLIC.NAVY.MIL/USFF/PAGES/AUTH_RESP_ACC_MEMO.ASPX

3. DATES FOR THE UPCOMING TOWN HALLS ARE:
- NAVSTA NORFOLK (SURFACE), TUESDAY, 19 APRIL, 1330-1530
(CEP 86 AUDITORIUM)
- JEB LITTLE CREEK, MONDAY, 25 APRIL, 1330-1530 (NOSC)
- SUBASE KINGS BAY, FRIDAY, 6 MAY
- NAVSTA NORFOLK (AVIATION), MONDAY, 9 MAY, 1330-1530
(VISTA POINT)
- SUBASE NEW LONDON, WEDNESDAY, 18 MAY
- NAVSTA NORFOLK (OTHERS/MAKE-UP), FRIDAY, 20 MAY, 0930-1130
(VISTA POINT)
- NAS OCEANA/DAM NECK, TUESDAY, 24 MAY, 1330-1530
(CNATTU HANGAR 223)
NOTE: TIMES AND VENUES (NOT IDENTIFIED) WILL BE SENT SEPCOR.
4. THERE ARE VERY IMPORTANT ISSUES FOR US TO DISCUSS - FLEET
STEVENS AND I ARE LOOKING FORWARD TO THE DIALOGUE WITH YOUR
LEADERSHIP TEAMS.
5. ADMIRAL J. C. HARVEY, JR. SENDS.//
BT
#0081
NNNN

CNO on Information Dominance

Implementing Navy Information Dominance.  This is a strategic imperative for our Navy.  We must vigorously train our leaders and exercise their skills.  To remain masters of the sea, we must dominate in information dominance.  Our success will deliver a strategic advantage for the Nation.

Admiral Gary Roughead
Chief of Naval Operations
in a letter to all Navy Admirals and Vice Admirals
20 March 2011

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

Commander, Naval Activities Spain is Seventh Navy CO fired in 2011

The dual-hatted commander of Naval Station Rota/Naval Activities Spain was relieved "due to a loss of confidence in his ability to command."

Captain William Mosk had been in command since June 2008 and was to be relieved in June 2011 by Captain Scott Kraverath.. Mosk was fired on 18 April amid an ongoing Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) investigation on Naval Station Rota. Mosk was not personally under investigation nor is he facing any criminal charges. His biography and photo were removed from the NS Rota/NA Spain website.

He is the seventh commanding officer fired this year, and the fifth aviator.  Mosk was relieved by Rear Adm. Tony Gaiani, head of Navy Region Europe, Africa, Southwest Asia.  Commander Ron Dennis, Captain Mosk's executive officer, has taken command of Naval Station Rota until Mosk’s scheduled relief, Captain Scott Kraverath, arrives.


Captain William F. Mosk is a native of Southern California and graduated from UCLA with a degree in Economics. Entering the Navy through the Aviation Officer Candidate Program, he was commissioned an Ensign in May 1985.

Designated as a Naval Flight Officer in March 1986, his initial fleet assignment was to Patrol Squadron SIX at NAS Barbers Point, Hawaii. In 1990 Captain Mosk was selected for the Pilot Transition Program and was designated a Naval Aviator in June 1991. Since then he has served in several Patrol Squadrons including Patrol Squadron FORTY-NINE and Patrol Squadron FIVE at NAS Jacksonville, FL and Patrol Squadron TEN at NAS Brunswick, Maine. He has deployed worldwide to Misawa, Japan; Adak, Alaska; Cubi Point, Philippines; Diego Garcia; Keflavik, Iceland; Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico; and Sigonella, Italy. While in the Mediterranean in 1999, Commander Mosk flew 44 combat missions in support of Operation Allied Forces.

Mosk has also served at sea onboard PCU John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in Norfolk, Va., from 1995 to 1996 as Operations Administrative Officer and Officer of the Deck (underway). In 2004 he reported to USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67) as Navigator during a combat cruise in the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and the Global War on Terrorism. He also participated in numerous carrier qualification periods and Fleet Week 2005 in New York City.

Mosk reported to NAS Corpus Christi, Texas in November 2001 as Executive Officer of Training Squadron THIRTY-FIVE (VT-35) and assumed command in February 2003, leading the Stingrays to unparalleled achievements.

Captain Mosk’s staff jobs include serving with United States Joint Forces Command in 1999 to 2001 where he served as C4I Systems Modernization Branch Chief responsible for the Theater Air Missile Defense Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration. In 2006, he reported to U.S. Fleet Forces Command serving as the Current Operations Officer responsible for Maritime Homeland Defense and Defense Support of Civil Authorities.

In June 2008, Captain Mosk assumed command of Naval Activities Spain and Naval Station Rota. He has logged over 4,500 flight hours in the P-3 and C-12. His military awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, two Meritorious Service Medals, two Air Medals, three Navy Commendation Medals, and two Navy Achievement Medals as well as numerous other unit and service decorations.

Captain Joseph J. Rochefort Distinguished Leadership Award

FM COMFLTCYBERCOM FT GEORGE G MEADE MD
SUBJ: THE CAPTAIN JOSEPH ROCHEFORT INFORMATION WARFARE (IW) OFFICER DISTINGUISHED LEADERSHIP AWARD//
RMKS/1. THE PURPOSE OF THIS MESSAGE IS TO ANNOUNCE THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CAPTAIN JOSEPH ROCHEFORT INFORMATION WARFARE (IW) OFFICER DISTINGUISHED LEADERSHIP AWARD AND SOLICIT NOMINATIONS FOR THE INAUGURAL YEAR.
2. CAPTAIN JOSEPH JOHN ROCHEFORT WAS A MAJOR FIGURE IN THE U.S. NAVY'S CRYPTOLOGIC AND INTELLIGENCE DEVELOPMENT FROM 1925 TO 1947. HE HEADED THE NAVY'S FLEDGLING CRYPTANALYTIC ORGANIZATION IN THE 1920'S AND PROVIDED SINGULARLY SUPERB CRYPTOLOGIC SUPPORT TO THE U.S. FLEET DURING WORLD WAR II, LEADING TO VICTORY IN THE WAR IN THE PACIFIC. AT THE END OF HIS CAREER (1942-1946), ROCHEFORT SUCCESSFULLY HEADED THE PACIFIC STRATEGIC INTELLIGENCE GROUP IN WASHINGTON. ROCHEFORT DIED IN 1976. IN 1986, HE POSTHUMOUSLY RECEIVED THE PRESIDENT'S NATIONAL DEFENSE SERVICE MEDAL, THE HIGHEST MILITARY AWARD DURING PEACETIME, FOR HIS CONTRIBUTIONS DURING THE BATTLE OF MIDWAY.
3. THE INTENT OF THE CAPTAIN ROCHEFORT IW OFFICER DISTINGUISHED LEADERSHIP AWARD IS TO ANNUALLY RECOGNIZE THE SUPERIOR CAREER ACHIEVEMENT OF ONE IW OFFICER. IN THE SPIRIT OF CAPTAIN ROCHEFORT, SPECIFIC CONSIDERATION WILL BE GIVEN TO LEADERSHIP, TEAMWORK, OPERATIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS AND ADHERENCE TO THE PRINCIPLE BY WHICH HE SERVED, "WE CAN ACCOMPLISH ANYTHING PROVIDED NO ONE CARES WHO GETS THE CREDIT."

More information is available on INFOWARRIORS.NET HERE.

Somehow, I missed this back in January - former cyptologist makes good

Former Special Duty Cryptology Officer - David Rice has been hired by Apple, Inc., as their Global Director of Security. 

Dave is an internationally recognized cybersecurity leader and author of the critically acclaimed book Geekonomics: The Real Cost of Insecure Software. He is one of the key figures shaping the discussion and practice of cybersecurity at the national level.

Dave was a Global Network Vulnerability Analyst for the National Security Agency and a Special Duty Cryptology Officer for the United State Navy.  He has been recognized for "significant contributions" to the Department of Defense and the National Security Agency for developing security configuration and design guidance for critical national infrastructure and global networks. He holds an M.S.in Information Warfare and Systems Engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California.  He is a 1994 graduate of the United States Naval Academy with a B.S. in Physics.

B.Z. Dave - you made us all proud !!

Monday, April 18, 2011

NPC Working Hard To Improve Its Website Accuracy and Timeliness

www.npc.navy.mil

After an Information Week attack back in July 2010, (when the Navy Personnel Command's website was listed among the 12 government websites with the worst user experience), NPC unveiled a new face for its website as it moved to a new server hosted by Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) on April 11. 

It took 10 months, but it is an improvement.  The NPC Strategic Communications Officer, LCDR Delmy Robinson told me that NPC uses nearly 250 different  web authors.  With the new server and format, those authors will get regular prompts to update their pages.  Moderators of the website have to verify over 6 thousand pages.  It's a monumental effort.  Your constructive feedback to them will be appreciated.

With the improved website, NPC got rid of a lot of old information and the web authors are now reminded to update their pages automatically on a monthly basis.  This should improve the user experience and provide more accurate/timely information for our Sailors.

Scarey truths ?

We train people to deal with their bosses in a certain way: Find out what they want, and do that, just barely, because there are lots of other things that must be done. Figure out how to do exactly what they want, with the least amount of effort, and the least risk of failure and you are a 'good Sailor.'

The attitude of minimize is a matter of self-preservation. Raise the bar, the thinking goes, and the boss will work you harder and harder. Take initiative and you might fail, leading to a reprimand or relief (think about that word for a second... pretty frightening).

The linchpin, of course, can't abide the attitude of minimize. It leaves no room for real growth and certainly doesn't permit an individual to become irreplaceable.

Lifted from SETH GODIN's Blog Here.

Sunday, April 17, 2011

CAPT. John W. Mackin Jr., USN (Ret.)


Captain John W. Mackin, Jr., USN (Retired) passed away on April 13, 2011 at his Kissimmee, FL home surrounded by his loving family. Born in Oneida, NY in 1937, John, an accomplished athlete, was a graduate of the University Of Notre Dame, a campus he loved. After college, he graduated from U.S. Naval Officer Candidate School in Newport, RI, and was commissioned in 1960.

This began his 31+ year Naval career in which he served his country with distinction at many military installations and ships worldwide.CAPT Mackin served honorably for more than 31 years.  He retired from the Navy following his tour as CO, NSGA Homestead in 1991.  During his career, he was assigned to DEFSMAC, CINCPACFLT, Ops officer NSGA Homestead, USS OXFORD, (AGTR-1) during Vietnam, COMNAVSECGRU, Army Security Agency, CINCLANTFLT, NCR Taiwan, Senior Navy Exec to DIRNSA, Deputy NSA B-Group, Chief NSA B1, JOCCP Lead, and CO, NSGA Homestead.  Throughout his career, he displayed excellence in the field of National Security and Cryptologic operations, but it was also unabiding love of our country, sense of duty and commitment to teamwork that made him the highly respected officer and leader. He advanced to the rank of Captain and retired in 1991 after serving as Commanding Officer, Naval Security Group Activity, Homestead, FL. John then relocated to the Orlando Area, while serving as a Group Vice President for SunTrust Corporation.

John is survived by his wife of 48 years Donna J. Mackin; their three children, John M. (Beth) Mackin, Jill N. (Matthew) D'Amico, Jeffrey N. (Donna) Mackin; nine grandchildren; and his brother James E. Mackin. Services and burial with full military honors will be held at Arlington National Cemetery at a date to be determined. Contributions in his memory may be made to Cornerstone Hospice of Osceola County. Arrangements under the direction of Osceola Memory Gardens Funeral Home, 2000 13th Street, St. Cloud, FL. www.osceolamemgds.com for online condolences. 407-957-2511.

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Rear Admiral Tighe presented with distinguished alumni award at NPS - you may have missed this

Rear Admiral Jan Tighe, Deputy Director of Operations (Deputy J3) for the U.S. Cyber Command was recognized in September 2010 as a Naval Postgraduate School Distinguished Alum.

“I knew General Alexander was going to be recognized as a Distinguished Alumnus (DA),  but this  (her own recognition as a DA) came as a complete surprise,” Tighe said. “I’m very honored and proud to be an NPS alum. It’s a wonderful institution whose faculty and staff are top notch.”

Article By: Amanda Stein

The Naval Postgraduate School has a reputation for educating and supporting some of our military’s best leaders in the most pressing areas of national security today. In each graduating class, some students stand out with noticeable potential to do great things with their education and leadership abilities as they rise above and beyond the already exceptional standards that NPS sets.  One such student was recognized on March 26, when the Secretary of Defense, Robert M. Gates announced the nomination of Navy Captain Jan E. Tighe to the rank of Rear Admiral (lower half). Her current promotion will make her the first female IW Rear Admiral as well as the first Ph.D. IW Rear Admiral, an achievement that comes as no surprise to those who know her.

“I realize that the fact that I’m the first woman selected to Flag Rank as an IW officer is significant to those coming up in the ranks and I am grateful to have the opportunity to represent all that is possible in our great Navy,” Tighe said. “Our community’s core skills have never been more in demand by the Navy and the nation than they are today. That makes for both increased opportunities and responsibilities for the IW community and the larger Information Dominance Corps. I’m excited to be part of it.”

Tighe graduated from the Naval Postgraduate School in 2001 after receiving both her Master’s degree in Applied Mathematics and her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering. She also studied Russian at the Defense Language Institute. Her time spent studying as an Information Warfare (IW) officer on the Monterey Peninsula prepared her for the challenges she would face in the field.

Her dedication to the Navy and to Information Warfare have paid off during her time in the service, earning her the Defense Superior Service Medal, Legion of Merit, Meritorious Service Medal, the Strike/ Flight Air Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal, and the Navy Achievement Medal.

“I am honored and humbled by the Navy’s selection of me for Flag Rank. It is a privilege to continue to serve the Navy and the wonderful men and women in the Information Warfare community as part of the larger Information Dominance Corps. Throughout my career I’ve never felt held back as a woman in the Navy. Being able to embark on this next part of the journey reaffirms that assertion,” she noted.

After graduation, she went on to serve as Chief Staff Officer and Chief Engineer for the Naval Information Warfare Activity, but she always held fast to the importance of education for Naval officers. NPS Professor Jeffrey Knorr recalls Tighe’s endless commitment to helping her fellow officers, even after she had left NPS.  “She’s obviously a very smart and capable lady. After she left here, she promoted the education of officers in her community,” said Knorr, who served as Chairman of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering during the time that Tighe attended NPS. “She actually set up a program where officers came here from Naval security sites around the world, 25 at a time. Each quarter we had a series of short courses that we designed specifically for them. The program continued for a number of years.” 

Information Warfare has a growing demand as cyber security and counter terrorism experts face new challenges with evolving technologies. The Chief of Naval Operations has placed an increasing focus on the field of Information Dominance with the recent N2/N6 merger, keeping the Navy positioned to respond to threats.

Tighe says that respect for the value of education carries on, and she continues to grow and learn as she interacts with leaders from the intelligence community, the Department of Defense, Congress, the White House, and other government agencies on how to best protect our nation.

“The notion of lifelong learning is not an option for me, it’s in my DNA. I loved every minute of my time at NPS, whether in the classroom or doing research. Clearly, for the Information Warfare community, the electrical engineering program is one of several curricula at NPS that is foundational to the technical aspect of our mission. I have been able to apply that knowledge gained at NPS to every subsequent job.”

Having come from a family of educators, she knows the importance of learning from both an institution, and from the experience of those around her. Tighe currently serves as executive assistant to Lieutenant General Keith B. Alexander, current Director of the National Security Agency, Chief Central Security Service, and Commander, Joint Functional Component Commander-Network Warfare.

“More important than what Lt. Gen. Alexander does each day is being able to watch how he does it. While he is an incredibly gifted technical leader, he is also a thoughtful and dedicated leader who is devoted to his people and his family at the same time. Balancing mission accomplishments with the needs to build, train, retrain and reward the workforce is something he does very well. I hope that I can come close to living up to the standard of great leadership that he has set.”

Friday, April 15, 2011

Information Dominance Corps SYNCHRONIZATION

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Remembering the tragic shootdown of Deep Sea 129 and the loss of 31 Aircrew brothers

Flight of Deep Sea 129

Beggar Shadow mission

At 07:00 local time of Tuesday, 15 April 1969, an EC-121M of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Airborne Reconnaissance Squadron One took off from Atsugi, on an intelligence-gathering reconnaissance mission.

The aircraft, Bureau number 135749, c/n 4316, bore the tail code "PR-21" and used the radio call sign Deep Sea 129. Aboard were 8 officers and 23 enlisted men under the command of LCDR James Overstreet. Nine of the crew, including one Marine were Naval Security Group cryptologic technicians (CTs) and linguists in Russian and Korean.

Deep Sea 129's assigned task was a routine Beggar Shadow signal intelligence (SIGINT) collection mission. Its flight profile northwest over the Sea of Japan took it to an area offshore of Musu Point, where the EC-121M would turn northeast toward the Soviet Union and orbit along a 120-nautical-mile (222 km) long elliptical track. These missions, while nominally under the command of Seventh Fleet and CINCPAC, were actually controlled operationally by the Naval Security Group detachment at NSF Kamiseya, Japan, under the direction of the National Security Agency.

LCDR Overstreet's orders included a prohibition from approaching closer than 50 nautical miles (90 km) to the North Korean coast. VQ-1 had flown the route and orbit for two years, and the mission had been graded as being of "minimal risk." During the first three months of 1969 nearly 200 similar missions had been flown by both Navy and U.S. Air Force reconnaissance aircraft off North Korea's east coast without incident.

The mission was tracked by a series of security agencies within the Department of Defense that were pre-briefed on the mission, including land-based Air Force radars in Japan and South Korea. The USAF 6918th Security Squadron at Hakata Air Station, USAF 6988th Security Squadron at Yokota Air Base, and Detachment 1, 6922nd Security Wing at Osan Air Base monitored the North Korean reaction by intercepting its air defense search radar transmissions. The Army Security Agency communications interception station at Osan listened to North Korean air defense radio traffic, and the Naval Security Group at Kamiseya, which provided the seven of the nine CTs aboard Deep Sea 129, also intercepted Soviet Air Force search radars.

At 12:34 local time, roughly six hours into the mission, the Army Security Agency and radars in Korea detected the takeoff of two North Korean Air Force MiG-17s and tracked them, assuming that they were responding in some fashion to the mission of Deep Sea 129. In the meantime the EC-121 filed a scheduled activity report by radio on time at 13:00 and did not indicate anything out of the ordinary. 22 minutes later the radars lost the picture of the MiGs and did not reacquire it until 13:37, closing with Deep Sea 129 for a probable intercept.

The communications that this activity generated within the National Security network was monitored by the EC-121's parent unit, VQ-1, which at 13:44 sent Deep Sea 129 a "Condition 3" alert by radio, indicating it might be under attack. LCDR Overstreet acknowledged the warning and complied with procedures to abort the mission and return to base. At 13:47 the radar tracks of the MiGs merged with that of Deep Sea 129, which disappeared from the radar picture two minutes later.

At first none of the agencies were alarmed, since procedures also dictated that the EC-121 rapidly descend below radar coverage, and Overstreet had not transmitted that he was under attack. However when it did not reappear within ten minutes, VQ-1 requested a scramble of two Air Force Convair F-102A Delta Dart interceptors to provide combat air patrol for the EC-121.

By 14:20 the Army Security Agency post had become increasingly concerned. It first sent a FLASH message (a high priority intelligence message to be sent within six minutes) indicating that Deep Sea 129 had disappeared, and then at 14:44, an hour after the shoot-down, sent a CRITIC ("critical intelligence") message (the highest message priority, to be processed and sent within two minutes) to six addressees within the National Command Authority, including President Richard M. Nixon and National Security Advisor Henry Kissinger.

A search and rescue effort was immediately launched by VQ-1 using aircraft of both the U.S. Air Force and Navy. The first response was by an Air Force Lockheed HC-130 Hercules, with a Boeing KC-135A Stratotanker tanker in support and an escort of fighters, but the search effort rapidly expanded to a total of 26 aircraft. At short notice, two U.S. Navy destroyers, USS Henry W. Tucker and USS Dale, sailed from Sasebo, Japan, on the afternoon of April 15 toward the area of last contact (41°2800N 131°3500E / 41.4666667°N 131.5833333°E / 41.4666667; 131.5833333), a position approximately 90 nautical miles (167 km) off the North Korean port of Ch'┼Ćngjin.

The first debris sighting occurred at 09:30 the next morning, 16 April, by a Navy VP-40 P-3B Orion aircraft. Two destroyers of the Soviet Navy #429 Kotlin Class and #580 Kashin Class were directed to the scene by the Navy aircraft. The Air Force HC-130 SAR aircraft, that relieved the P-3B, dropped the Soviet ships URC-10 survival radios and eventually made voice contact in the afternoon as the Soviet craft were departing. Both Soviet ships indicated they had recovered debris from the aircraft but had not found any indication of survivors. That evening Tucker arrived in the area and after midnight recovered part of the aircraft perforated with shrapnel damage.

At approximately noon of 17 April Tucker recovered the first of two crewmen's bodies, then rendezvoused with the Soviet destroyer Vdokhnovenny (D-429) and sent over her whaleboat. The Soviets turned over all of the debris they had collected. The bodies of Lt.j.g. Joseph R. Ribar and AT1 Richard E. Sweeney were taken to Japan but those of the other 29 crewmen were not recovered.

North Korea publicly announced that it had shot down the plane, claiming it had violated its territorial airspace. The U.S. government acknowledged that it was conducting a search for a missing aircraft but stated that it had explicit orders to remain at least 50 nautical miles (93 km) offshore. Of note, April 15 was the 57th birthday of the North Korean dictator Kim Il-Sung.

From WIKIPEDIA

Those lost include:

Lcdr. James H. Overstreet,
Lt. John N. Dzema,
Lt. Dennis B. Gleason,
Lt. Peter P. Perrottey,
Lt. John H. Singer,
Lt. Robert F. Taylor,
Ltjg. Joseph R. Ribar,
Ltjg. Robert J. Sykora,
Ltjg. Norman E. Wilkerson,
ADRC Marshall H. McNamara,
CTC Frederick A. Randall,
CTC Richard E. Smith,
AT1 Richard E. Sweeney,
AT1 James Leroy Roach,
CT1 John H. Potts,
ADR1 Ballard F. Conners,
AT1 Stephen C. Chartier,
AT1 Bernie J. Colgin,
ADR2 Louis F. Balderman,
ATR2 Dennis J. Horrigan,
ATN2 Richard H. Kincaid,
ATR2 Timothy H. McNeil,
CT2 Stephen J. Tesmer,
ATN3 David M. Willis,
CT3 Philip D. Sundby,
AMS3 Richard T. Prindle,
CT3 John A. Miller,
AE3 LaVerne A. Greiner,
ATN3 Gene K. Graham,
CT3 Gary R. DuCharme,
SSGT Hugh M. Lynch,(US Marine Corps).
 
REST IN PEACE